Another mysterious explosion demolishes home in Indiana — Captain: No fire with blast (VIDEO)

Published: November 14th, 2012 at 8:57 am ET
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(Subscription Only) Title: House explodes near Albion
Source: KPC News
Author: Bob Braley
Date: Wednesday, November 14, 2012, 1:00am

A house in rural Albion exploded Tuesday afternoon, demolishing the building and leaving a couple homeless, the Albion Fire Department said. The home of Pete M. and Ella Jimenez at 2435 E. C.R. 175, was destroyed by the explosion, said Albion Deputy Fire Chief John Urso [...]

Title: Explosion destroys rural home in Noble County
Source: AP
Date: Nov. 14, 2012
h/t guezilla

[... Albion Deputy Fire Chief John] Urso tells WANE-TV that firefighters had the propane gas and other utilities to the house shut off but that there was no fire from the explosion. The blast sent debris across the road and left the home’s second-floor section toppled onto the ground.

Firefighter Tim Tumbleson tells The News Sun that the explosion shook his house about a quarter-mile away.

Title: Explosion destroys Albion home
Source: WANE
Date: Nov. 14, 2012

  • “Firefighters still aren’t sure exactly what happened” -Reporter
  • “I didn’t see any flames” -Resident
  • “It’s undetermined what caused this because there was not fire with this explosion” -Fire Captain John Urso
  • “It took the home off its foundation. That could tell you right there that type of explosion to take a house off its foundation had to be pretty substantial.”
Published: November 14th, 2012 at 8:57 am ET
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26 comments

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26 comments to Another mysterious explosion demolishes home in Indiana — Captain: No fire with blast (VIDEO)

  • lickerface lickerface

    Get the free scanner radio app for your smartphone now! Listen to the actual responders and avoid the questions…


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  • WorseThanChernobyl

    I wonder if these Indiana explosions are somehow tied with the huge radiation spike that showed up on the radiation monitoring network back in June. I know the network claimed it was a malfunction, but there were also explosion sounds and black, military helicopters in the area at the same time as the spike, and then nearby monitoring sites showed elevated radiation levels as well.

    http://www.naturalnews.com/036158_nuclear_explosion_Indiana_radiation.html

    http://naturalsociety.com/indiana-radiation-elevated-levels-other-states-media-stays-silent/

    http://www.infowars.com/shaking-booms-snapped-trees-in-half-days-before-indiana-radiation-incident/


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    • Plan Nine

      Energy beams, black helicopters, falling meteors – there seems to be tolerance for these speculations here, but wait a minute…

      What if these blasts are random ignitions of hydrogen-oxygen clouds released by some decrepit NPP? Now will we see the shills pounce?

      Plan Nine


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      • The Blue Light.

        This hydrogen/oxygen cloud thing is BS. When a child's balloon is released it goes up at about 3 feet per second and that's helium. Hydrogen is even lighter, when that's release into the open it rises at 10 feet per second. It goes up into low orbit and is swept away by the solar winds into deep space.


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        • Plan Nine

          I merely suggested hydrogen-oxygen as a possible explanation for some of these numerous unexplained explosions (fracking could well be the culprit). Your dismissal as BS, based on balloon ascension rates (a curious piece of info to have on hand, btw) is complicated by the fact that hydrogen is explosive in air at a concentration betweem 4 and 75%, and does not take into consideration atmospheric conditions such as downdrafts. Imho, it merits as serious a discussion as any of the other speculations here.

          Plan Nine


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  • Sickputer

    I doubt Albion or the Indy explosions will be "mysterious" forever. We have the factors of cold weather, houses fed with natural gas and the Albion rural house had natural gas lines and a large propane tank. No fire at Albion which is not unusual in natural gas fires…the blasts essentially extinguish all oxygen for a brief second in the massive release of energy. Houses may have secondary sources (fireplaces for example) that ignite fires after the first gas explosion which would explain the secondary fires in the Indy neighborhood.

    The most classic example of a natural gas explosion without a fire was the New London, Texas school house explosion in March 1937. 495 students, educators, and staff died from a basement full of natural gas exploding. It was all over in seconds and no fire. A twenty-year-old reporter by the name of Walter Cronkite was sent from Dallas to cover the devastation.

    Gas explosions differ from solid phase explosions (bombs or missiles) in that bombs create craters while natural gas explosions blow outward 360 degrees and don't focus on a particular area.

    As for speculation that underground raw natural gas or even industry stored propane or natural gas is to blame for these incidents …. I doubt it.

    It is far more likely that if such an event occurs it will be massive in scale from underground caverns and we won't be talking about a few houses or a business explosion. It will dwarf New London.


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  • enoughalready45 enoughalready45

    This one looks like a natural gas explosion. We have all seen them before. This one would not normally be called to everyone's attention except for the larger explosion and fire that occured at the other location in Indiana.


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  • many moons

    I think this will all be recorded as the group of natural gas explosions in Indian,…..however the first explosion was much more sinister…the second was perhaps created to make it seem like it's all a natural gas problem from folks who haven't serviced their heating units….


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    • guezilla

      Having been credited for this second news piece… I'll add I think they're both natural gas explosions. For the first one this keeps looking more and more likely – now both the mother and daughter who lived in the house at the center of the explosion have came out saying they DID smell gas before. And, sadly, according to their statements starting right after the boyfriend "fixed" the furnace thermostat, as the psycho-seeming ex-husband had alleged. (I should note the media should never have dragged that up, but what can you do…)

      I'm sure all the conspiracy-theorists will come out to say that's just because the family is being pressured into making these statements to hide the aliens or mind-controlled with HAARP waves or whatever, but honestly all the evidence matches gas explosion and not the wild conspiracy-theories. Of course, with the appliance blown to bits they're likely never going to prove it conclusively, and even if the do… "planted evidence". So conspiracy gold, I guess.

      This latter one is actually little more bewildering, as it happened within days of the earlier one with everybody still on edge and being told to check their gas appliances and keep smelling for gas… And according to the news clips the couple were currently living in the house, seemingly just went out for something, and boom, the second floor achieves lift-off. There's doubtlessly more to it, but for now it sounds lot more freaky as they should've definitely smelt the gas.


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  • vivvi

    Wondering when stuff is gonna start exploding in outback Queensland, where apparently the fracking is releasing ridiculous amounts of methane into the atmosphere. Whoops. http://www.smh.com.au/environment/methane-leaking-from-coal-seam-gas-field-testing-shows-20121114-29c9m.html


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  • dosdos dosdos

    Please, hire a professional to check your furnace each year before using it.


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  • markww markww

    Ihave sent message to Firefighters Via twitter to start checking for gas around homes that are exploding in the central USA Markww


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  • Radio VicFromOregon

    If it sounds like a missile, then, markww, that goes back to your meteor or meteorite theory. They can come in very noisily. We had very similar events back in the mid 90's with Hale-Bopp. That time it was the Southern Mid-western states. The media didn't figure it out until some astrophysicists watching the showers gave them a call. People puzzled for days. Finally one hit a car and didn't break apart quite so much, so they got a piece of it. Another came through a house, but, also didn't explode or break apart and they got that piece, too. Same neighborhood on different days. But, the odd thing here is that they are only hitting houses, although, houses certainly make good sitting targets. It's also possible that they are hitting elsewhere and no one is noticing because it is remote or they are burning up in the atmosphere first. But, now with Sandy spewing things everywhere and the methane layers melting, maybe a meteorite hitting low vapors might tend to ignite?


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    • Radio VicFromOregon

      Alright, if gas is involved after all and people are starting to fess up to smelling it, then it has got to be gas in at least one. This house was clearly thrown up and out, not hit from above. Windows were closed so no hydrogen/oxygen nuclear gas cloud, which i'm not even sure if that can happen outside an NPP, no big hole in the roof so no falling rocks, though i have seen meth labs look like this but these folks weren't cookin', right? Some people don't smell the odor. I've been in building with gas leaks and half the folks never smelled a thing. Not even the gas company! A very small leak that accumulated. My grandmother, bless her bathtub gin making heart, use to live near LA and the first thing after an earthquake, she'd go turn off the gas. Even small shakes can loosen a house line. Many folks don't do this or check their lines afterwards. I also figure people are trying to save on maintenance given the economy so that's going to increase the wear and tear a little, too. Meteorite could have done one of the houses in NJ. But, it didn't do this one, so i have to retract my theory.


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      • Maggie123

        Wow, Vic – thanks for 'turn off gas following quake' tip – will pass along to Calif family and never thought of it!

        By the way – re checking your own lines, which might make sense in a place with frequent small quakes –

        dishsoap + small bit of water makes a solution that can be smeared at line joins, around valves, etc and will form bubbles if there's a minute leak.

        Learned that from a technician, watched him do a demo.

        Please note – *only* a home provisional test – does *not* substitute for skilled safety check!


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      • Plan Nine

        I proposed hydrogen-oxygen clouds as a possibility in some of these "mysterious" explosions because, as WorseThanChernobyl suggested, there may be a correlation with high radiation readings in the areas. Also, hydrogen ignitions are sometimes referred to as "invisible fire" by firefighters, which is consistent with this incident. And finally, guess what gas is frequently used to cool large electric power generators more effectively than air, be they nuclear or conventional – HYDROGEN!

        Plan Nine


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  • Maggie123

    Thanks for many giving input here that 'normalizes' these explosions.

    And thank you also for reminders – keep gas fired appliances in good repair, have them checked for safe operation – as Dosdos suggests – annually!

    Also – know where your in-line shut-off is! Just once I happened to have a weird 'little fire' break out at a very old gas range's oven dial. Thankfully the gas in-line shutoff valve was not far away. If I hadn't happened to be home, and wandering in/out of kitchen, I'd maybe have lost my house – Yikes!!


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  • timemachine2020 timemachine2020

    @markww Hey Mark – remember when I brought to your attention the possibility of the drone theory a couple days ago and then you posted the link to idahopickers video? I just noticed another possible link to that possibility. Look at the blast pictures especially the overhead shots and tell me if you see what I think I see. There looks to be a blast pattern coming from the back side of the house goibg towards the front side in a V pattern as if a missile or projectile came in from the back side and blew out the front (like right out the front doorish). LMK what you think.


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  • timemachine2020 timemachine2020

    I also do not think that this incident is related to the most recent other house and restaurant explosions are. The most recent home and restaurant were not as powerful or destructive as the one that took out those 2 homes and did the damage to so many others.


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  • Cindy

    could the gas they use for fracking, somehow be collecting up into homes, then they explode ?


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