AP: Fukushima Daiichi blackout has continued for hours — 3 fuel pools without fresh cooling water

Published: March 18th, 2013 at 12:13 pm ET
By
Email Article Email Article
19 comments


Title: Crippled Japanese nuclear plant suffers blackout
Source: AP
Date: March 18, 2013 12:02p ET

[...] The operator of Japan’s tsunami-damaged nuclear plant says a power failure has left three fuel storage pools without fresh cooling water for hours.

Tokyo Electric Power Co. says the blackout Monday night at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant was brief at its command center but continued for hours at three of the seven fuel storage pools and a few other facilities. [...]

[Tepco] plans to restore power to the pool cooling systems as soon as it determines the cause. It says the nuclear fuel stored in the pools will remain safe for at least four days without fresh cooling water.

UPDATE: NHK: Another fuel pool loses cooling system at Fukushima Daiichi -- CBC: May take days to repair

Published: March 18th, 2013 at 12:13 pm ET
By
Email Article Email Article
19 comments

Related Posts

  1. Blackout at Fukushima Daiichi — Cooling at fuel pools stopped March 18, 2013
  2. Power still not restored at Fukushima Unit 3 fuel pool and Common Fuel Pool — No fresh cooling water for over a day — Tepco: Extremely sorry it took so long to announce blackout March 19, 2013
  3. Kyodo English: ‘Problem with electric power’ at Fukushima Daiichi — Cooling systems suspended at 3 fuel pools March 18, 2013
  4. NHK: Another fuel pool loses cooling system at Fukushima Daiichi — CBC: May take days to repair March 18, 2013
  5. Temperatures rise in Fukushima fuel pools after nearly 20 hours without power — Crews “scrambling” to fix problems — Tepco placing “highest priority” on Unit 4 March 19, 2013

19 comments to AP: Fukushima Daiichi blackout has continued for hours — 3 fuel pools without fresh cooling water

  • larry-andrew-nils

    Is that true? Will it remain safe for four days?


    Report comment

    • Centaur Centaur

      Jupp. As long, as no further complications occur, it should be.

      See also here: http://tinyurl.com/7zwr3rc


      Report comment

    • Centaur Centaur

      PS: Don't get a heart attack when following the link:
      It's an OLD news reference from mid-summer 2012.

      PPS: The temperature-per-time increase ratio is key.


      Report comment

      • We Not They Finally

        And you got this from WHERE? It says March 18, 2013 and "Monday night" is NOW in Japan as they are at least a half-day ahead of us time-wise.


        Report comment

        • Centaur Centaur

          yes, you're right. thanks for mentioning it. – the immediate consequence, taking this fact into account is this: keeping in mind, that we're 9 months later into the accident now, than when those numbers were calculated (and stayed uncontradicted up till today afaik)… that means on first hand, that there is even less decay heat in all of the spent fuel now than back then as decay heat drops exponentially with time unless no recriticalities occur…

          keep also in mind, that SFP #4, which was taken as a basis for the calculations back then contains the most – and also the most "hot" – fuel of all spent fuel pools (except the common SFP in regard to total fuel mass of course, but that one also has the largest total water mass in it and is also the easiest to supply with fresh cooling water/external means of cooling), so the timeline for all other pools will be even less strict than the one for SFP #4 (which has appx. 2 weeks until "emergency level #2" kicks in, according to Gundersen via TiS, see here: http://tinyurl.com/cf4oxvh).


          Report comment

    • Auntie Nuke

      Define "safe." "Unexploded," "Uncritical," "Still deniable/spinnable/lie-able" are all closer to the truth.


      Report comment

  • roundabout1

    Common sense says we are in a heat of trouble! If cooling systems weren't important, we wouldn't have them. Don't let rhetoric get in the way.


    Report comment

  • The CBC has picked it up (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation)

    Wonder of wonders, our main Canadian news source has kicked in (this means it's very important):

    Crucial system fails at Japan's quake-damaged nuclear plant
    Workers at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant scrambling to fix broken cooling system in 3 reactors
    CBC News Posted: Mar 18, 2013 12:48 PM ET Last Updated: Mar 18, 2013 1:05 PM ET Read 0 comments0
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2013/03/18/japan-daiichi-nuclear-plant-failure.html

    Well done CBC! (We can be friends again now and start eating bananas together).

    And now, off for a walk, while I still can.


    Report comment

    • m a x l i

      Your "friends" are trying their best to make us happy. As you can see in the photograph to the article, Fukushima-Daiichi got fixed up by TEPCO nice and clean, it looks like they will start up all the reactors in coming days. Well done!


      Report comment

  • pcjensen

    does the constant onslaught of radioactive materials on mechanical systems eventually break them – can the mechanics withstand constant irradiation?


    Report comment

  • amberlight amberlight

    No earthquake, no tsunami, no apparent sabotage, but they can't keep vitally important power going at a critically damaged NPP. And we are supposed to believe that this chained monster, aka "Our Friend the Atom," can't snap its chains and wreak havoc on all life?

    Not to worry, folks. Everything is under control…


    Report comment

  • fredlvie

    isn't it incredible? don't they have emergency generators yet at the plant for the cooling systems?????


    Report comment

  • harengus_acidophilus

    If I read between the lines:
    > has left three fuel storage pools without fresh cooling water
    Why "fresh water" instead of "cold water"?

    h.


    Report comment

    • We Not They Finally

      "Fresh" probably means replacement water because it continually boils off. The big (previous) concern was that spent fuel pool at reactor 4 would "collapse" because it is elevated many stories above ground level. But the concern about ALL the fuel pools is them running dry.


      Report comment

  • We Not They Finally

    When does "We'll get it fixed in a few days" (2, 3, 4, "whatever") intersect with we think maybe, possibly, conceivably, those fuel pools will be o.k. for four days? And when does "We'll fix it" intersect with "….when we figure out what's wrong"? Just asking….


    Report comment

  • Update from Dr Robert Jacobs on the cooling problem. (Hopefully I'm not reposting or duplicating anything. My fingers are flying all over the place today….).

    I think he might be channeling TEPCO a bit, but still:

    Update On Power Outage At Fukushima Daiichi
    http://www.simplyinfo.org/?p=10023

    TEPCO has released a document confirming a few things and with some additional information.

    These facilities are still out:
    Units 1, 3 and 4 spent fuel pool cooling
    Common pool cooling
    Gas handling at unit 3
    Kurion water filtration system
    Unit 2 is not mentioned. They reference primary and secondary pool cooling systems for units 3 and 4 as both being out and only the secondary for unit 1. TEPCO goes on to give outage temperature increase estimates for units 1, 3, 4 and the common pool. TEPCO’s estimates for heat up increase seem plausible, our estimate for unit 4 spent fuel pool heat up rate was .19℃/h

    Unit 1:
    Temp increase rate: 0.076℃/h
    Temp as of 3.18 afternoon: 16℃

    Unit 3:
    Temp increase rate: 0.146℃/h
    Temp as of 3.18 afternoon: 13.7℃

    Unit 4:
    Temp increase rate: 0.368℃/h
    Temp as of 3.18 afternoon: 25℃

    Common Pool:
    Temp increase rate: 0.226℃/h
    Temp as of 3.18 afternoon: 25.2℃


    Report comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.