Asahi Headline: Incinerating radioactive material could contaminate environment

Published: May 22nd, 2012 at 10:34 am ET
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Subscription Only: Incinerating radioactive sewage sludge could contaminate environment
AJW by The Asahi Shimbun
By NOBUTARO KAJI/ Staff Writer
May 22, 2012

Incinerating the radioactive sludge that has piled up at sewage facilities across eastern Japan and burying it after mixing it with cement could increase the risk of cesium seeping into the environment, scientists say.

[...]

the results of a research team led by Hideo Yamazaki, a professor of environmental analysis at Kinki University, suggest the process may increase the risk of the transfer of radioactive cesium into the environment. Instead, the scientists found that adding clay to the incinerated material may offer a safer way of processing it.

[...]

The transfer rate soared to 2.87 percent when cement was added.

[...]

The Tokyo metropolitan government is burying it in landfill sites after mixing the ash with cement and water.

[...]

Published: May 22nd, 2012 at 10:34 am ET
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16 comments

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16 comments to Asahi Headline: Incinerating radioactive material could contaminate environment

  • arclight arclight

    ive already given the link to the undersea dump sites…. i find it hard to believe they are not utilising these 4 vast waste dumps 200 km off the coast..

    luckily the IAEA has monitoring rights agreed by china and russia.. so we should believe the smoke and mirrors..

    "The Tokyo metropolitan government is burying it in landfill sites after mixing the ash with cement and water."

    cement eh? help it to sink that would! ;)


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  • arclight arclight

    just a quick link here to show you what to expect when they burn waste
    dramatic gieger reading 0.75 mcSv/hr peak straight to the lungs!!
    welcome to london :( (cough!)

    london uk radiation alert 15/5/2012
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFZAYmwgcxw

    err and 2 links eh?

    eurdep update and uk radiation warning 15 may 2012 Part 1/2
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xhtsHcwO1aY

    part 2 covers hungary etc (on the description)


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    • arclight arclight

      actually.. mercoule gave a similar type of gieger reading.. that was a nuclear furnace too! and it just had a wee fire apparently/sarc

      that makes decommissioning and medical reactors worse than the nuclear power plants.. are the japanese measuring the outputs from the waste incinerators ??


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  • CaptD CaptD

    I expect Tokyo Bay to become Japan's Dump site, that way they are not guilty of dumping radioactive pollution into the "OCEAN" but of course that is silly since what goes into the Tokyo Bay will migrate into the Pacific Ocean…

    There is even talk of building a new reactor on Tokyo Bay (no worries about high background radiation), since GREED rules in Japan!

    Bye Bye Northern Japan…


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  • Cisco Cisco

    Aging Nukes: A four-part investigative series by Jeff Donn of Associated Press

    This investigative series by Jeff Donn is the best reporting I’ve come across about the state of the US nuclear power generating industry. Even as a reasonably well read and versed researcher on nukes, I discovered new and significant data that I did not have. It’s long, but an easy and interesting read. For those of you who want to know more, I recommend it highly.

    I’m hopeful the administrator will find a place on the main page for easy access to this investigative series.

    The series had a profound impact. The stories ran on more than 85 front pages, played prominently on leading websites, and generated thousands of social networking shares and tweets. It also set off a raft of newspaper editorials and a few government investigations. The series also drew praise from many of the scientists and engineers who understand the issues best.

    You can read the entire series here:

    Part I http://www.ap.org/company/awards/part-i-aging-nukes
    Part II http://www.ap.org/company/awards/part-ii-aging-nuke
    Part III http://www.ap.org/company/awards/part-iii-aging-nukes
    Part IV http://www.ap.org/company/awards/part-iv-aging-nukes
    Interactive http://hosted.ap.org/interactives/2011/aging-nuclear-plants


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    • Whoopie Whoopie

      Hey Cisco, I'll post that to HP!
      ty


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      • Cisco Cisco

        Whoopie, thanks…FYI, this investigative series was published June 2011

        Correction/Error: I missed the "s" in "nukes" in the link for Part II. Here's the full string again with the edit

        Aging Nukes: A four-part investigative series by Jeff Donn of Associated Press

        This investigative series by Jeff Donn is the best reporting I’ve come across about the state of the US nuclear power generating industry. Even as a reasonably well read and versed researcher on nukes, I discovered new and significant data that I did not have. It’s long, but an easy and interesting read. For those of you who want to know more, I recommend it highly.

        I’m hopeful the administrator will find a place on the main page for easy access to this investigative series.

        The series had a profound impact. The stories ran on more than 85 front pages, played prominently on leading websites, and generated thousands of social networking shares and tweets. It also set off a raft of newspaper editorials and a few government investigations. The series also drew praise from many of the scientists and engineers who understand the issues best.

        You can read the entire series here:

        Part I http://www.ap.org/company/awards/part-i-aging-nukes
        Part II http://www.ap.org/company/awards/part-ii-aging-nukes
        Part III http://www.ap.org/company/awards/part-iii-aging-nukes
        Part IV http://www.ap.org/company/awards/part-iv-aging-nukes
        Interactive http://hosted.ap.org/inte


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        • ENENews

          Informative comment Cisco. Though, next time can you make it on a more 'on-topic' post, like one where the report is about US reactors? It's no big deal, we are just trying to keep things a bit more organized. Thanks, admin


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  • "…Disposal of the sludge, which is THOUGHT to have been created after radioactive materials from the Fukushima nuclear disaster were carried by rainwater into sewage pipes and then condensed during sewage treatment, has become a MAJOR HEADACHE for local governments." – from article

    Major Headache = Public Relations Nightmare

    How many years worth of this 'goo' do they think they can continue to bury?

    Your 'perception' of radioactive contamination is more important to governments and corporations than is the reality of the situation.

    situation = Greatest man-made world changing catastrophe in history

    "However, your assessed RISK is low, there is no reason for concern." They will repeat repeat.

    The TRUTH is… your assessed risk level can no longer be accurately calculated at this time and your CONCERN should be at an all time HIGH.


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  • BreadAndButter BreadAndButter

    "The transfer rate soared to 2.87 percent when cement was added."
    ??
    Does that mean 2.87% of the mixture's cesium leaked into the environment? Or what? Any thoughts? I'd expect it ALL to leak (sooner or later, that is).
    Good thing though that Asahi is catching up.
    I imagine some big *gulps* as they think of all the stuff they already buried.


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  • Max1 Max1

    Could contaminate?
    What goes up… Must come down.

    Spinning Wheel – Blood Sweat and Tears
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kK62tfoCmuQ


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