Cyanobacteria and alpha radiation detected 350km from Fukushima Daiichi (VIDEOS)

Published: May 30th, 2012 at 12:02 am ET
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From the website of Koichi Oyama, Minamisoma City Council: http://mak55.exblog.jp/15929675/

May 26, 2012 in Toyama, Ishikawa Prefecture



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Published: May 30th, 2012 at 12:02 am ET
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28 comments

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28 comments to Cyanobacteria and alpha radiation detected 350km from Fukushima Daiichi (VIDEOS)

  • Ron

    Sorry this is off topic. I've tried submitting via the tips link before but I don't think it worked.

    Anyway,

    TOKYO—Japan's former leader blamed missteps in handling last year's nuclear crisis on advice from experts with a vested interest in preserving nuclear power, as the country continues to grapple with the question of what caused the accident and who was responsible.
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303395604577432160100182398.html?mod=googlenews_wsj


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  • VanneV anne

    What are cyanobacteria?
    "Cyanobacteria are micro-organisms which are half way between bacteria and algae. Like bacteria, cyanobacteria is microscopic. Like algae, it possesses pigments which permit photosynthesis (chlorophyll is responsible for the green colour).
    It is important to note that cynanobacteria are not aquatic plants.
    Cyanobacteria develop during the summer in shallow, tepid, calm and nutrient-rich waters (containing phosphorous and nitrogen).
    Cyanobacteria are not always visible on the surface because they are frequently disseminated in the water column. Generally speaking, they become visible when they are bunched together in the same place. In this case, we can observe a blue-green colour in the water or on the surface. Eventually a green scum (or foam) forms on the surface of the water. While wind, waves and current tend to disperse them they may reappear. Bunches of cyanobacteris may sometimes be accompanied by disagreeable odours.
    "The problem of bodies of water being affected by cyanobacteria exists throughout the world and that includes some lakes in the Eastern Townships including the Montérégie and Estrie sectors as well as elsewhere in Quebec.
    "Let us remember that cyanobacteria are at the origins of life and have been present on our planet for some 2.5 billion years. The problem is their too large numbers due to human activity which perturbs the natural balance.


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  • VanneV anne

    Spirulina, Chlorella, and Klamath Blue Green Algae:
    What is the Difference?
    “Many people ask us about the difference between Klamath Blue Green Algae (Aphanizomenon Flos Aquae or AFA), spirulina and chlorella. AFA and spirulina are blue green algaes while chlorella is a green algae, which means it has an indigestible cellulose wall. This wall must be mechanically broken in order for the body to be able to digest it. This is a very expensive process and is reflected in the cost of the product.
    “Spirulina and chlorella are cultivated in man-made ponds whereas AFA is wildcrafted from Upper Klamath Lake where it grows in a pristine, mineral rich environment that cannot be duplicated synthetically. The difference in energy one receives from these whole foods is similar to the difference between cultivated produce and foraged wild vegetables and fruits. In general, one needs to take only a third as much AFA per day.
    “Spirulina and Chlorella are usually heat processed for commercial distribution. The cell walls of Spirulina are carmelized during spray drying, making it difficult for enzymes to penetrate the algae cells during digestion. This results in low assimilation of proteins and other nutritional components. Spray drying can also kill enzymes, losing heat sensitive components and decreasing beta-carotene due to the high temperatures that may be involved.”
    http://www.momentum98.com/spirulinahistory.html


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  • VanneV anne

    “…Blue-green blooms can pose a human health concern. Although most blue-green blooms are not toxic, some blue-green algae produce nerve or liver toxins. Toxicity is hard to predict in part because a single species of algae can have toxic and non-toxic strains. Also a bloom that tests non-toxic one day can turn toxic the next day.
    “People may become ill after swimming or water skiing in lakes with toxic blue-green algae. Rarely, humans may experience stomach pains, vomiting, diarrhea, and skin rashes. Nerve and liver damage have been observed following long-term exposure such as drinking water with toxic blooms. Pets and wildlife have died after exposure to toxic blue-green algae in Washington lakes, but worldwide there are no confirmed deaths of humans from algal toxins.
    “Three genera of cyanobacteria account for the vast majority of blooms, including toxic blooms, world-wide: Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, and Microcystis – sometimes referred to as Annie, Fannie, and Mike. In Washington, Aphanizomenon does not seem to produce toxic blooms, although the other two genera have produced toxic blooms in Washington lakes. A bloom can consist of one or a mix of two or more genera of cyanobacteria….”
    http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/wq/plants/algae/publichealth/GeneralCyanobacteria.html


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  • VanneV anne

    Degradation of Cyanobacterial Biosignatures by Ionizing Radiation
    http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/ast.2011.0663


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    • VanneV anne

      Abstract

      "Primitive photosynthetic microorganisms, either dormant or dead, may remain today on the martian surface, akin to terrestrial cyanobacteria surviving endolithically in martian analog sites on Earth such as the Antarctic Dry Valleys and the Atacama Desert. Potential markers of martian photoautotrophs include the red edge of chlorophyll reflectance spectra or fluorescence emission from systems of light-harvesting pigments. Such biosignatures, however, would be modified and degraded by long-term exposure to ionizing radiation from the unshielded cosmic ray flux onto the martian surface. In this initial study into this issue, three analytical techniques—absorbance, reflectance, and fluorescence spectroscopy—were employed to determine the progression of the radiolytic destruction of cyanobacteria. The pattern of signal loss for chlorophyll reflection and fluorescence from several biomolecules is characterized and quantified after increasing exposures to ionizing gamma radiation. This allows estimation of the degradation rates of cyanobacterial biosignatures on the martian surface and the identification of promising detectable fluorescent break-down products. Key Words: Mars—Life-detection instruments—Spectroscopic biosignatures—Photosynthesis—Endoliths. Astrobiology 11, 997–1016…."
      http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/ast.2011.0663


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  • VanneV anne

    [Google translation of Japanese artible:]
    Article (unclassified) the same category
    ■ "Info reader" excellent 5/30 (2012-05-30 08:11:00)
    ■ country, prefecture, the city does not calculate the amount of exposure from the initial disaster. (2012-05-29 20:58:00)
    ■ surface dose is approximately 1μSV "becquerel / Kg 10 millions" (2012-05-29 16:27:25)
    ■ Mr. Tatsuhiko Kodama Promotion Committee Chairman decontamination (2012-05-29 15:47:00)
    ■ why the government is not forced to work (2012-05-29 03:00:00)
    [PR] The name fittingly, name surname ○ ○ △ △! Isomerization of all chemistry highest
    by mak_55 | 2012-05-27 20:49 | Trackback | Comments (2)
    << I know. Ordinance violation >> basic environmental Minamisoma | May 28,
    Trackback URL: http://mak55.exblog.jp/tb/15929675
    To Trackback (members only) [help]
    Commented by Hama at 2012-05-27 21:40 x
    Of Tokyo, for cyanobacterial world is full it has been through ¨ ¨. It is felt not insane ¨ ¨ nationwide.
    Commented by mak_55 at 2012-05-28 07:03
    Good morning Hama san.
    The Twitter of the City Council Itsui remark in Kiryu is Yuki Niwayama I will report.
    Black or blue-green algae for Koto Soma south through to the more brilliant it is.
    http://mak55.exblog.jp/15929675/


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  • VanneV anne

    Microbes in the Ocean
    “More plankton exist in sea water than any other organism. Microscopic forms include protists and bacteria. Phytoplankton are photosynthetic organisms, including algae. By harvesting the energy of the Sun and converting it to their tissues, phytoplankton form the basis of the food chain in the ocean. All ocean organisms depend on phytoplankton either directly or indirectly. Eventually, humans consume ocean creatures such as fish. Even human life, therefore, is tied to the presence of phytoplankton.
    “Microbes such as plankton also have other benefits. In the ocean, they help make some nutrients available to other living marine creatures. Elemental iron, for example, is important for living creatures but is scarce in the ocean. Sunlight can change iron to a form that can be taken up by plankton and other microbes. The microorganisms are used as food by other organisms, such as fish and ocean mammals, making the iron available to other creatures in the food chain.
    “Cyanobacteria, a type of bacteria, played an important role in the history of Earth and in ocean processes, including the development of stromatolites (see photograph on page 80). Living in colonies, the cyanobacteria produced oxygen during the process of photosynthesis, which generated the oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere that many living beings require today.


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  • VanneV anne

    What do you think the ads for biofuels are about? What do you think they are going to be growing for these biofuels?


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    • GeoHarvey

      Some species of cyanobacteria store energy in forms we can convert to fuels and are capable of reproducing very fast. A mass of these will double daily, under proper conditions. Arjun Makhijani says they will make 100 tons of fuel per acre, which is about twelve times what we would get from corn.
      Also, spirolina, the dietary supplement and food, is from cyanobacteria of a genus once given the scientific name Spirolina, but is now called Arthrospira.


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  • BreadAndButter BreadAndButter

    To me, these japanese gravel-like cyanobacteria remain a mystery. Too bad the guy who filmed it didn't take a reading on the spot.
    Have we ever seen any confirmation about the composition of the stuff?
    As far as I know, "cyanobacteria" was also just a guess. Or not?
    Is there something I missed?


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    • moonshellblue moonshellblue

      Yes we have some old news concerning cyanobacteria in Japan located right here on Enenews or Goggle. I think It is coming from the corium producing dust which can be seen emanating from the ground at Fukushima, catches a ride on the wind and lands. It is not uncommon for bacteria to grow around ventilation systems etc at nuke plants. There was some kind of bacteria growing on the corium removed from TMI. Strange brew……NO NUKES


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  • GeoHarvey

    I wonder if the title of this article shouldn't be indicating the alpha radiation was from the cyanobacteria, rather than in it.
    Cyanobacteria, aka blue-green algae, are nearly everywhere. They are one of the most important groups of critters out there, as they are responsible for much of the photosynthesis on the planet.
    This looks like the black substance we have been reading about. Perhaps these organisms concentrate things that emit alpha radiation, but are made darker in the process, rather like some plants that produce flowers of a different color when exposed to radiation.


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  • GeoHarvey

    Sorry, the first sentence is unclear. I meant to say I wonder whether the title should not have read "Cyanobacteria emitting alpha," etc., instead of "Cyanobacteria and alpha."


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  • razzz razzz

    Obviously we are on a need to know basis as you can't get an answer to: "What the hell is this stuff and where did it come from?" Besides, is this stuff toxic or are any of its byproducts dangerous?


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