Decontamination Scandal: Japan experts say gov’t just waiting for radioactivity to decrease by itself — “I really doubt their seriousness” says professor

Published: November 9th, 2011 at 10:05 am ET
By
Email Article Email Article
19 comments


Radiation cleanup plan falls short, Japan Times, Nov. 9, 2011:

Experts liken current strategy to letting nature run its course [...]

“I really doubt their seriousness (about decontamination),” said radiation expert Tomoya Yamauchi, a professor at the Graduate School of Maritime Sciences at Kobe University. [...]

[The gov't has] the goal of reducing the contamination by 50 to 60 percent over two years.

Decontamination efforts by humans, however, are expected to only yield a reduction of 10 to 20 percent. [...]

The experts said the government’s goal of human effort achieving a 10 to 20 percent reduction is not ambitious enough.

“A 10 percent reduction doesn’t really mean anything. I mean, 40 percent of the radiation would be reduced just by natural causes, so I think the government is almost saying it is just going to wait for the radioactive materials to decrease naturally,” said Shunichi Tanaka, former chairman of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan. [...]

Published: November 9th, 2011 at 10:05 am ET
By
Email Article Email Article
19 comments

Related Posts

  1. Deception? NYT: Experts seriously doubt gov’t Fukushima control claims — Fear Japan only trying to “appease growing public anger” December 15, 2011
  2. Japan Experts: Unknown if radiation will decrease over time — May rise again as highly contaminated debris comes from mountains January 4, 2012
  3. DPA Headline: ‘Experts warn of possible catastrophe at Japan reactor’ — Professor Koide praises Tepco, faults gov’t June 13, 2012
  4. Freelance Journalist in Japan: Fukushima gov’t dumping tons of radioactive mud from decontamination into river at night February 8, 2012
  5. 16 of Japan’s Top Pro-Nuke Experts: “We deeply apologize to the public” for Fukushima — “I never predicted that we would cause the public so much trouble” — Yet, “Atomic power is so wonderful” January 26, 2012

19 comments to Decontamination Scandal: Japan experts say gov’t just waiting for radioactivity to decrease by itself — “I really doubt their seriousness” says professor

  • There is no White Flag, Mean while, Radiation deforms prisoners, Radiation executes masses !


    Report comment

  • Misitu

    One would therefore suppose that the government will be investing heavily in palliative and end of life healthcare instead.

    It is impossible for a simple anglosaxon to come to grips with such mentality …


    Report comment

  • arclight arclight

    and the iaeas thoughts??

    6 October 2011 | Jakarta, Indonesia
    Ministry of Research and Technology

    IAEA Contribution to International Peace, Security and Prosperity
    by IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano
    “6 October 2011 | Jakarta, Indonesia
    Ministry of Research and Technology

    IAEA Contribution to International Peace, Security and Prosperity
    by IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano “
    “The IAEA has a large and active technical cooperation programme in Indonesia, supporting many peaceful nuclear applications in human health, agriculture, water and other areas. Since Indonesia took the decision some years ago to embark on a nuclear power programme, we have worked more and more closely together in this area.

    And that is where I would like to begin my speech to you today – by talking about the global outlook for nuclear energy, especially in the aftermath of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan

    As you can imagine, the accident, and its aftermath, have taken up much of my time in the past seven months. The IAEA was actively involved in assisting Japan in dealing with the consequences of the accident and in sharing information with other Member States. I would like to thank the Indonesian authorities for offering their assistance to Japan.”

    “Our assessment of the current situation at Fukushima Daiichi is that the reactors are essentially stable. The expectation is that the “cold shutdown” of all the reactors will be achieved as planned. Attention has already turned to decontamination of the affected areas.

    At our annual General Conference last month, the IAEA’s Member States adopted a 12-point Action Plan on Nuclear Safety which, I believe, represents a significant step forward in global nuclear safety. It includes an agreement by all Member States with nuclear power programmes to assess the design of their nuclear power plants against extreme natural hazards, and to take corrective action where necessary.
    cont….


    Report comment

    • arclight arclight

      ……The Action Plan also strengthens the framework for IAEA peer reviews. These involve dispatching international expert missions to assess the safety of a country’s nuclear reactors, its emergency preparedness and response capabilities and the effectiveness of its nuclear regulatory system. I am pleased to note that Indonesia hosted an IAEA Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review mission in 2009. I believe all countries have much to learn from the peer review process.”

      And finally this nugget!!

      “Despite the Fukushima Daiichi accident, a large number of countries continue to regard nuclear power as an important option. In fact, the latest IAEA projections show that global use of nuclear power will continue to grow quite significantly in the coming decades, although at a slower pace than in our previous projections. There are 432 operating nuclear power reactors in the world today. Our latest projections suggest that this figure is likely to increase by at least 90 by 2030, and possibly by as much as 350. Asia looks set to remain the main focus of the expansion.

      The factors that contributed to increasing interest in nuclear power before the Fukushima Daiichi accident have not changed: these include increasing global demand for energy, as well as concerns about climate change, volatile fossil fuel prices and security of energy supply. A few countries have decided to scale back, or even terminate, their nuclear power programmes, but many others are proceeding with ambitious expansion plans. In particular, the resolve of many developing countries to introduce nuclear power to meet their increasing energy needs remains undiminished.”

      http://www.iaea.org/newscenter/statements/2011/amsp2011n026.html


      Report comment

    • Misitu

      Thanks arclight, and re “Our assessment of the current situation at Fukushima Daiichi is that the reactors are essentially stable. The expectation is that the “cold shutdown” of all the reactors will be achieved as planned. Attention has already turned to decontamination of the affected areas”

      They are living on which planet? Not mine I think. Maybe they can build all their plants on the other planet. Grr. Lies. Rubbish.


      Report comment

      • gr81 gr81

        The “REACTOR” is in “COLD SHUTDOWN” I guess, technically speaking: as the fuel has left the reactor and is several tens of feet BELOW the reactors. And no use worrying about that old fuel because it will burn itself out, eventually!

        The reactors could use some patching up tho!

        Meantime: depopulation continues as mandated in Agenda 21.


        Report comment

  • http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/site/?pageid=event_desc&edis_id=NC-20111109-32993-USA

    The Fermi 2 plant in Monroe County is among 35 U.S. nuclear reactors being advised to test their ability to shut down automatically after an earthquake. DTE Energy officials say the Fermi 2 reactor is routinely tested to make sure it’s not susceptible to the problem. GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy says the probability of a reactor not shutting properly is very low. DTE spokesman Guy Cerullo says the utility “diligently” performs monthly control rod drive operability tests and quarterly tests in which all control rods are inserted at different times. The Monroe Evening News reports Tuesday DTE says it stays in close contact with GE and other nuclear energy facilities and that safety is its “number one priority.”


    Report comment

  • maaa

    Clear link between nuclear power fallout and cancer. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tawjKl79bPg


    Report comment

  • arclight arclight

    citizens are not waiting for the contamination to decrease by itself…. +100

    “Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2011

    Residents sue over Tsuruga reactors
    Kyodo
    OTSU, Shiga Pref. — A group of about 40 people sued Japan Atomic Power Co. on Tuesday seeking a provisional court order not to restart two reactors at its Tsuruga nuclear power plant on the Sea of Japan in Fukui Prefecture.

    In the suit filed with the Otsu District Court, the plaintiffs argue that Lake Biwa, Japan’s biggest lake and source of water for the Kansai region centering on Osaka, could be contaminated and residents could be endangered if a nuclear accident occurs at the plant.

    Currently the plant’s two reactors, one with output capacity of 357,000 kw and the other with capacity of 1.16 million kw, are shut down for regular checkups.

    The plaintiffs, mainly residents of Shiga Prefecture just south of Fukui Prefecture, insist that the Tsuruga plant was built on a site with a fault below it, leaving it susceptible to a severe accident.”

    “Japan Atomic Power declined to comment on the lawsuit, saying it was not aware of the details.”

    http://www.japantimes.co.jp/text/nn20111109a2.html


    Report comment

  • Grampybone Grampybone

    Only now they realize “decontamination” is a sham? I’m appalled that it took this long for people to realize this. Iodine contamination will be completely gone in 16 days where as Cesium will take 60 years. That does not account for the other radioactive isotopes that will take much longer to disintegrate such as Uranium. They can clean up all the cesium and iodine they want, but it will not change the fact that alpha emitters will be around forever. I guess they really just gave up this time. It sounds about right considering it is impossible to decrease radiation that is continually spewing from the plant. I just wish they would stop lying to the public already.At least we know TEPCO’s plans now…Do nothing and hope it gets better. Sounds like a faith based plan Harold Camping thought up.


    Report comment

    • westcoastguy westcoastguy

      im sorry but it will take a lot longer for cesium and iodine to completely disintegrate. in 8 days iodine 131 disintegrates to half. then 8 more days half of what its disintegrated to. so if there was 80 becquerels that would be 40 in 8 days. then 20 in 8 more days etc so for isotopes like cesium 137, it will take hundreds of years before it fully disintegrates. japans pretty fucked. history will repeat itself most likely in the US next. and if we had a meltdown here our government would be doing the same thing to us as in japan


      Report comment

    • Auntie Nuke

      Actually, Grampybone, the formula is half life times between 10 and 20 cycles to get to inert. Iodine is 80 days (8 days x 10), Cesium 137 is 300 years (30 years x 10). I think it’s Cesium 134 that’s gone in a few year (not certain the half-life). The longer the half-life, the larger the number of half-life cycles are necessary to get the isotope to inert. Plutonium requires 20+ – just think “forever” and you’ll be just about right…


      Report comment

  • radegan

    “It sounds about right considering it is impossible to decrease radiation that is continually spewing from the plant. ”

    What? Radiation is spewing from the plant? Good Lord, have you told anyone?


    Report comment

  • Digilert 100

    Hey, check this out. Japan Times article teaching people on how to do your own ‘decontamination’. http://www.japantimes.co.jp/text/nn20111109f3.html

    Look at this part of the article:

    ‘What should you do with the soil and leaves?

    Put all the waste into plastic bags and bury them on your property, covering the hole with 20 cm to 30 cm of soil and plastic tarps, until they can be removed to longer-term, but still temporary, municipal storage sites.

    Leaves and weeds can be disposed of as burnable garbage, a Fukushima official said’

    Lmao. Fukushima govt’ is telling people they are burning highly-radioactive leaves and weeds that are disposed of by the general public. I guess it never crossed their minds that when burned, it just sends the radiation back up in the air again, spreading it even more! And what about the radioactive ash that is left over after burning? I guess that will just be dumped into the sea. When will the insanity end?


    Report comment