Doctor in Fukushima: Many feel they’re being used as human guinea pigs

Published: January 9th, 2013 at 12:37 pm ET
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Title: As radiation fears dwindle, so do checkups
Source: The Japan Times Online
Author: MIZUHO AOKI
Date: Jan. 10, 2013

As radiation fears dwindle, so do checkups

[...] “local people have almost no worries (about radiation exposure because of eating contaminated food) these days. . . . They are satisfied with their results from last year (where many were below detectable levels),” [Dr. Masaharu Tsubokura] said.

“Also, there are many people who feel they were being used as human guinea pigs” in the first round and don’t want to take part in the followup tests, he added. [...]

As for the most worrisome internal radiation exposure levels in the early days of the nuclear disaster, radioactive materials consumed have already been discharged from bodies and the amount can no longer be estimated, he said.

“The weakest point of these checkups is that we are not estimating the internal exposure amount of residents immediately after (the meltdowns). And we haven’t been able to measure exposure to radioactive iodine-131″ that has a half-life of just eight days, Tsubokura said. “Those are lost forever. The only way [is to guess ...]“

Published: January 9th, 2013 at 12:37 pm ET
By
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80 comments

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80 comments to Doctor in Fukushima: Many feel they’re being used as human guinea pigs

  • Christopher Busby talks about the whole body scans as a means for coverup and suggests taking hair samples and keeping them in the fridge:

    Busby: Japanese, refrigerate Your hair samples if You dont evacuate!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rJI7bwOXOx8
    [Uploaded on Sep 30, 2011
    Date the samples, and write at what length from the scalp it was cut, and where You lived under the period the hair grew! ]


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  • VanneV anne

    This headline is extremely sad. These people are not guinea pigs. This is not an experiment. They know exactly what will happen to people exposed to radiation. They've known since Madame Curie died of radiation poisoning.

    They are forcing people to live in Belorus. They are forcing people to live near nuclear power plants. They are forcing people to eat the food from Fukushima prefecture.

    They know that this means a sure and horrible death for these people. It is genocide, not an experiment. When Bill Gates wants to manufacture many small nuclear power plants and the government funds his scheme, it is a sure plan for total depopulation and destruction of the human genome.

    What will the parentage of radiation poisoning do to your descendents, if there are even any descendants still alive in 50 years?


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  • kintaman kintaman

    Feel? They are, there is no question about this. The have let themselves and their children become just that, science experiments.

    They had the chance to leave and did not for whatever reasons (mortgage, sense of loyalty/nostalgia to community, work, fear of the moving) and now they are all internally contaminated. Most have effectively destroyed their bloodlines as they will not likely have anything beyond grandchildren if at all.

    Thank you TEPCO for taking advantage of the simple Japanese people and desecrating the pristine lands that were worked on daily by farmers for hundreds and hundreds of years.

    All involved in these crimes (TEPCO management, politicians, IAEA, GE, Japanese PM's and politicians, nuclear "experts" who lied, media execs, tv anchors, reporters, etc) should be forced to do manual clean up at the nuclear plant in Fukushima with their entire families. They are traitors to the nation and to humanity. Scums of humanity. There can be no arguments on this. SEND THEM ALL THERE PERMANENTLY. Full stop.


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  • PattieB PattieB

    Watch this film… http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=rk5ai0gOQHU

    You will find that everyone is an expiromental subject to the Nuke-Napolians! They have set themselves above the laws of the lands….


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  • PattieB PattieB

    it's not global warming… it's global manipulation!

    They have complimentary programs running… and use this to direct who gets radioactive fallout, and just how much! It's not just about taking control of our food.

    http://govtslaves.info/documentarywhy-in-the-world-are-they-spraying/


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  • TheBigPicture TheBigPicture

    Doctors can't do anything for people exposed. And exposure is the whole Northern Hemisphere. Hair sample testing, and lawyers are on the way.


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  • PattieB PattieB

    On-GOING criticality events in remains of the #3 fuel pool… have a look!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=igKlJAjis2w


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  • Heart of the Rose Heart of the Rose

    "The failures of past attempts to protect human subjects in national security experiments call for a more impartial, balanced examination of the ethical, cultural and political factors and their influence on experimentation law. By understanding why the failures have occurred, more realistic approaches as described above may have a much better chance for progress. Now the government has argued that cold war national security and post 9-11 conditions require increased secrecy and the sacrifice of individual rights guaranteed by the Constitution. Before accepting this argument, many lessons can be learned from the history of cold war human experimentation law within a framework of national security law and presidential powers."

    Human Research Subject Protections
    for National Security Experiments

    http://mindjustice.org/humprot2-06.htm

    There is no evacuation process going on in Fukushima.
    In the US and around the world ..data of exposure and consequences is being recorded..information is being suppressed.
    Guinea pigs..very much so.


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  • PattieB PattieB

    yes.. sparkles… but key bit is the nice blue glowing we have right below the flash-point!


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  • PattieB PattieB

    background…?

    USArmy missle systems tech, Nuke,Bio,Chem responce team member. MOS 16D-20, then 24-C communications and Sat-link tech. Civilian, AS Electromech & printed circut design, Cad-Cam. Owned a couple computer sales/repair stores… Contractor back in 95-96 @ NASA I Setup the class there to bring them into 20th century regarding computers. Bell South BST001 lead tech for rollout of the ADSL tech we all use now. then worked for Lockheed Martin for a bit, building anti-missle & Torpeado defensive warheads… then, they moved me to Polaris… I built all the sub-assembly for the I-Robot. That toy the been using to look around in the busted plants…? Need I go on?


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  • RADS

    When society dedicates itself to death, the outcome will be death. That's what this is all about after all. I always say the irony of it all is everything they protested in the 1960's-1970's has now happened, 100-300 reactors across the globe, 24,000 nuclear bombs, countless amounts of DU ammo to shoot, Countless Tons of nuclear waste, gas releases everyday from power plants, accidents. Question really is, are we really going to accept cancer/mutation as normal practice?


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    • PavewayIII PavewayIII

      "…I always say the irony of it all is everything they protested in the 1960's-1970's has now happened…"

      This should lead one to believe that those methods of activism were particularly useless and will continue to be useless.

      If you owned a McDonald's and Ronald was dangerously insane, would you annoy everyone in your store with signs, chanting and petitions to convince everyone else that Ronald was dangerous? Would you appeal to Ronald's better senses to convince him that he was dangerous?


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      • blackbeer blackbeer

        Is that what you think the activist movement of the 60's and 70's was all about, really, to just annoy people. I would hate to think that my friend in those days were killed on those street because they were annoying. We knew every day we were putting our lives on the line when we headed out. I can assure you we weren't thinking about annoying people. But, if that, in retrospect, is all we did then history has cheated us again. I do hope it is only your perspective…………….

        Tom


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        • DisasterInterpretationDissorder DisasterInterpretationDissorder

          Thanks blackbeer . You where laying the foundations for today , on many levels.


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        • PavewayIII PavewayIII

          "…Is that what you think the activist movement of the 60's and 70's was all about, really, to just annoy people…"

          Well, no. If you re-read my reply, I specifically referred to the *methods* having little apparent effect. I'm not sure how you shoe-horned *motivation* into my observation. The point I was trying to make with Ronald was that people feeding their face in your restaurant wouldn't (just a guess) want to see/hear the manager complaining about an insane employee.

          To connect the dots a little better, the assumed reaction (again, my guess) would be, "Well, you *own* the place. Do something about your crazy employee. Don't tell me about it unless it comes with free fries."

          I don't question the motives of the 60's and 70's activists. In fact, I don't even question their choice of methods – mass protests were effective to various degrees throughout history. It would have been a reasonable choice for 60's activists. In retrospect, they had little effect for the amount of effort expended.

          Democracy requires the participation of an educated and informed public. Qualify that with state/industry-approved- or state/industry-censored- education/news and you just cut the legs out from under an effective democracy. If you don't have a truly educated or truly informed public, then single-issue protests effectively become acts of desperation.


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        • PavewayIII PavewayIII

          "…We knew every day we were putting our lives on the line when we headed out…"

          Wow. You guys were… like, HEROS!

          Spare me, blackbeer. Vietnam put so many people in a box that your 'sacrifices' pale in comparison. The old, rich guys got tired of America's inability to win (whatever that means) the war and the draft was failing. That's why it ended, not protests. As for nukes? Protests=Fail.

          I'm not oblivious to the dangers of protesters being chased down a street by a cop or some crew-cut guy in a green leisure suit swinging a two-by-four and singing "God Bless America"! That speaks to effort and conviction and is duly noted. That doesn't change the eventual effect, or lack thereof.

          Any activist old-timers should be the first ones to encourage younger activists to be smarter and look deeper into the cause of these issues. Of course they can change the press, the government and the public. They can't just dust of grandpappy's old-timer marginally-effective (if that) activism and add Twitter. Mass-marketing methods to force awareness of single issues is about as effective as e-mail spam or junk mail. 'Easy' does not mean 'effective'.


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          • blackbeer blackbeer

            I have to temper my reaction here because somehow I have allowed you to strike a nerve and because I really don't know where you are coming from I will try and keep my feeling at bay. Of course I have to believe that our work in the streets had something to do with bringing about an end in Nam. Bell was making money hand over fist after facing the possibility of going broke, as were most of the military industries of the time. I know I looked forward to my mail over there to hear news of the protest movement back home because I knew that there was just too much money to made to end it all from a moral stand point. I do admit that mass protest has seen it's time come and go but it served it's purpose back then. I'm afraid that an educated public will bring about little change in this country in this day and age simply because I see what we are willing to except in order to maintain or "exceptional" life style. I may have miss read your statement and this is all for not but I do feel you are miss informed on this issue. Of course I could be wrong and if so I'm sorry and don't mean to offend………
            By the way, I don't consider myself a hero nor did anyone I know either in the movement or in the Nam………..

            Tom


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            • VanneV anne

              blackbeer, You did bring about change. There were no new nuclear energy plants built for 30 years. The nucleocrats and globalists are much more savvy now and have figured out how to stop mass protests by draconian means and through control of the mass media. I don't even know how the public today can achieve what the activists of yesteryear accomplished. I've always been very proud of what yesterday's activists achieved. I don't know how we can achieve the same today. The ruling psychologists are stomping out all protests.

              Besides the flicker rate on TV which hypnotizes the public to believe what they see there, they can control the waves that come from all the cell phone towers, GWEN towers, and HAARP to make everyone complacent and docile. There is probably something in all the processed food and GMOs and we know that flouride is the drinking water makes people complacent.

              I am appalled by the politicians who studied Germany to hone these mind controlled crowds (for sure, Condy Rice and Newt Gingrich, but probably all of them). The politicians run for office to line their pockets, and just vote the way they are told. And the public believes that the elections are fair (even though they have no say so as to who runs for office) and that there is democracy. So they have to put up with the elected officials.

              Yesterday's activists changed elections and voted out politicians who didn't serve the public.


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            • aigeezer aigeezer

              blackbeer, I don't think you and PavewayIII are that far apart – it's unfortunate the conversation developed the edge it did – emedia has that effect.

              Like you, I think the protests in the 'Nam era had a huge effect. Like PavewayIII, I think they still failed overall – to my horror and amazement – we really thought a corner had been turned after 'Nam.

              The establishment learned a lot from that era. They are now routinely ready for any protests and know how to marginalize them.

              Goosebumps. This had never been done before:

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_9OJnRnZjU

              It's hard to imagine today's media giving this kind of activity any coverage other than press handouts from the mayor's office. Things are different now. Where that leads is anyone's guess.


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            • PavewayIII PavewayIII

              Thanks for your service and thanks for you activism.

              "…I know I looked forward to my mail over there to hear news of the protest movement back home because I knew that there was just too much money to made to end it all from a moral stand point…"

              I'm glad that the news of protests had (at least) that particular benefit for service members back then.

              We can disagree on the degree that activism contributed to ending that war. What should be clear though, is that the same machine that brought the world the Vietnam war proceeded to deliver subsequent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and will deliver a war in Syria in order to deliver a war in Iran.

              I insist protesting individual wars one-by-one as some kind of remedy up isn't working. You have to contain the machine, which requires the public to 1) understand that it exists and 2) truly understand that it simply cannot comprehend social cost and does not have the capacity for anything resembling normal empathy.

              Dumbing-down education to suppress critical thinking guarantees that will never happen. Loss (or maybe just awareness) of an independent media and journalists worried about their jobs are just a few more nails in the coffin.

              I'm 100% responsible for the damage that machine causes even (and especially) after I wear this bag of bones out. I don't know the answer, but I'm pretty sure what will not work. Maybe I'm wrong.


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              • blackbeer blackbeer

                I think the "edge" was my fault aigeezer, I am still amazed that the emotional scar is still alive and well from that era. Another reason why I feel so sorry for the people of Japan and what they still have to go through for many years to come, let alone what we ourselves will soon have to face. No need to thank me for my "service" Pavewaylll, I was phyops with a top secret clearance and I know who I was working for, I just did it in a marine corps uniform. Anne your words are so true and I thank you for jumping in on this and I guess I can't find fault in your thinking either Pavewaylll. We all have scars if we are in the fight for human rights and understand that the species has the right to evolve to it's true potential. I draw a lot of strength from the people on this forum, top notch folks………….

                Tom


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                • PavewayIII PavewayIII

                  Tom – at the time I read your comment about putting your lives on the line I had no idea you were a Vietnam vet. It seemed (to me – at the time) that you were referring to mortal danger from state-side protesting, which drew the snarky spare-me comment. I can see now that you were referring to your service and not suggesting (as I thought) that protesting was as risky as serving. Sorry for the confusion.

                  And my thanks still applies to your service. That comes from my (perhaps naive) assumption that most people showed up with the intention – at least initially – of being part of the noble, benevolent U.S. efforts to somehow make things better for everyone, everywhere. That's why the military isn't interested in geezers – we know better.


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                  • blackbeer blackbeer

                    Pavewaylll; I was referring to state side protesting. Back then it was the LA Tac Squad that I and my co-workers faced. Very well armed and very detached from the violence they heaped on us. I was not above violence myself, having just returned from the jungle and I had to tell those around me that I was not a pacifist and would defend myself against these goons and I usually had plenty of operational space around me. I think people who study these times have no way of understanding just how desperate we were, not only to bring about an end to an incredably criminal terrorist act in Nam but also an attempt to regain control of a runaway government. The other side was just as desperate to achieve "order" in anyway they could. Thus you had Kent State, but that was only one small news worthy event. It happened every day in my experience, maybe to a lessor degree but dead is dead, blindness due to concution, 4 foot long clubs due a lot of damage, et all. I was always amazed at the courage of those around me who had probably never experienced that kind of violence. I was used to it. Anyway, those days are long gone and I don't give them much thought, I can't give them much thought. Building blocks I guess…………….

                    Tom


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                    • blackbeer blackbeer

                      Also, my friend, and I meen that, my reaction here is kind of a flood gate kinda thing. I spend my life guarding against it but am not always successful. So please don't take it personally. And I will be more diligent.

                      Tom


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                    • PavewayIII PavewayIII

                      Thanks for taking the time to explain. Seriously, I'm afraid I'm losing my ability to understand or communicate with rational people anymore. I should work for the government.


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            • VanneV anne

              The protests of the 60s and 70s brought about much positive change.

              However, it is naive to believe that the fight for freedom will ever decide anything once and for all. The fight has to be made continually and forever for freedom.

              One thing they did was to privatize much of the armed services and to change the rest into a volunteer army.

              If people knew just how much nuclear power plants were destroying their health, their environment and their freedom, they might take action. We just seem to elect one dictator after another, each more despotic than the previous one. We vote for whomever seems to be the less evil, knowing that the system won't allow any other choices to win the election because there are not runoffs and because with the electoral college all hopes for democracy are stymied. They have more democracy in many other countries around the world.

              It is hard to stop wars when so much of private industry including the private contractors now profit from wars, and the general populace is willing to let others die for them.


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      • DisasterInterpretationDissorder DisasterInterpretationDissorder

        Paveway "…I always say the irony of it all is everything they protested in the 1960's-1970's has now happened…"

        This should lead one to believe that those methods of activism were particularly useless and will continue to be useless."

        Difference being this time we have a better argument on our side like you said "has now hanppend"


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        • PavewayIII PavewayIII

          DID – yes, the argument is better and that may make a difference. I'm still skeptical because the logic of that argument – no matter how strong – depends on an informed, rational and healthy person or organization is considering it and has the power to implement change.

          If Mother Teresa had become Tsarina of Earth, then this *better* argument would have surely swayed her thinking.

          I live in the United States though and see fewer and fewer difference between the entrenched power structures here than they had in Japan, Belarus and the USSR. How much better of an argument is even humanly possible today?

          Fine-turning the *argument* or marketing it better doesn't interest me anymore because it will NEVER work on Bechel, GE, Toshiba and certainly not on the utility companies.

          The cops I hired to keep them in check (the federal family, I guess) have gone rogue, hired their own private police forces, and won't return my calls anymore. They keep making up laws to prevent me from firing them but assure me that I am still free to pick a different one of THEM if I'm not satisfied.

          They've been buying all kinds of ammo for their private cops thugs lately and now they want more machine guns. They keep assuring me that this is to make me safer. Frankly, I'm getting a little concerned.


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      • Anthony Anthony

        PavewayIII this is a hard one to answer. I think there is no *reasoning* with the *Ronalds* of the world. There is nothing creepier than watching tape on Nuclear Bigwig Conferences… and they are perfectly fine that we oppose their agenda and almost feed on the opposition. To answer your actual question though is easy; if my Ronald was counterproductive to my McDonald's, I'd get rid of Ronald. Now how is this obvious and common sense answer applied to our real picture?


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    • PattieB PattieB

      we have 154 reactors that I know of currently in USA… most forget about the non-power generation ones. So… consider milt ones they don't list anyplace… call it 200 just for our slab of land… so, 500-600 may be more realistic a count on reactors. Then of course it doesn't count-in the rad-waste dump sites, and all that jazz!


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  • RADS

    Take a look at the peace symbol people just think it means *peace and love* by the blind meaning of nuclear disbarment, you cannot have peace or love on this planet if you go down the path of nuclear you cannot reverse course, the damage will always be done. The moral of the story is we've made our bed now we all sleep with it, and whatever you have to tell yourself to go to sleep that's a different story.


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  • Anthony Anthony

    Doctor in Fukushima: Many feel they’re being used as human guinea pigs

    I just wonder if this comes from a Doctor who denied to someone earlier today that they have radiation symptoms when they do?


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  • HUMAN GUINEA PIGS: OLD 400 HUNDRED REACTOR(?)operations superimposed on the pollution ongoing at Fukushima. Gofman has this to say: 99.9% perfection in containing Caesium would mean Caesium loss equivalent to 16 Chernobyl ongoing catastrophes(40 million Curies of Caesium released)per 25 years of operation.And this assault on health could occur without blowing the roof off any single plant. "[But] now that we know the hazards of low-level radiation, the crime is not experimentation, its murder." My calculation shows qquite plainly that normally operating nukess of the world, from 1980 to 2010 have caused an estimated 110 million infant mortalities, ten million of them in India alone.
    See http://isisunveiledhenp.blogspot.in/2012/05/normal-operations-of-nuclear-fuel-cycle.html


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  • HUMAN GUINEA PIGS: OLD 400 HUNDRED REACTOR(?)operations superimposed on the pollution ongoing at Fukushima. Gofman has this to say: 99.9% perfection in containing Caesium would mean Caesium loss equivalent to 16 Chernobyl ongoing catastrophes(40 million Curies of Caesium released)per 25 years of operation.And this assault on health could occur without blowing the roof off any single plant. "[But] now that we know the hazards of low-level radiation, the crime is not experimentation, its murder." My calculation shows quite plainly that normally operating nukes of the world, from 1980 to 2010 have caused an estimated 110 million infant mortalities, ten million of them in India alone.
    See http://isisunveiledhenp.blogspot.in/2012/05/normal-operations-of-nuclear-fuel-cycle.html


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