Doctor near Tokyo attributes symptoms to radiation exposure: We have begun to see increased nosebleeds, stubborn cases of diarrhea, and flu-like symptoms in children

Published: August 18th, 2011 at 4:18 pm ET
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Fukushima radiation alarms doctors, Dahr Jamail, August 18, 2011:

Japanese doctors warn of public health problems caused by Fukushima radiation.

[...] Doctors in Japan are already treating patients suffering health effects they attribute to radiation from the ongoing nuclear disaster.

“We have begun to see increased nosebleeds, stubborn cases of diarrhoea, and flu-like symptoms in children,” Dr Yuko Yanagisawa, a physician at Funabashi Futawa Hospital in Chiba Prefecture [located approximately 200km from Fukushima meltdown], told Al Jazeera.

She attributes the symptoms to radiation exposure [...]

More from Dr. Yanagisawa:

  • “We are encountering new situations we cannot explain with the body of knowledge we have relied upon up until now.”
  • “The situation at the Daiichi Nuclear facility in Fukushima has not yet been fully stabilised, and we can’t yet see an end in sight, [...] Because the nuclear material has not yet been encapsulated, radiation continues to stream into the environment.”
  • “Now the Japanese government is underestimating the effects of low dosage and/or internal exposures and not raising the evacuation level even to the same level adopted in Chernobyl [...] People’s lives are at stake, especially the lives of children, and it is obvious that the government is not placing top priority on the people’s lives in their measures.”
  • “Incidence of cancer will undoubtedly increase [...] In the case of children, thyroid cancer and leukemia can start to appear after several years. In the case of adults, the incidence of various types of cancer will increase over the course of several decades.”

Read the report here.

Published: August 18th, 2011 at 4:18 pm ET
By
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51 comments

Related Posts

  1. Japanese Doctor: Children’s health problems increasing — Incurable stomatitis, chest pain, nosebleeds that don’t stop, diarrhea April 18, 2012
  2. Japan Cancer Specialist: If this many people are having similar symptoms, doctors need to recognize them as symptoms of radiation exposure — Can’t be dismissed as a mere cold (VIDEO) November 2, 2011
  3. Fukushima Mother: Many children are showing symptoms of contamination — Nosebleeds, colds and coughs don’t end; Many kinds of eye problems — Tepco and gov’t ruined my life, I cannot forgive them (VIDEO) July 17, 2012
  4. Tokyo Paper: What’s happening to children 50 km from Fukushima plant? Nosebleed, diarrhea, lack of energy June 17, 2011
  5. “Muzzled”: Fukushima teacher quits after stopped from alerting students about radiation exposure — Asst. principal says “I don’t think the children are safe either” July 28, 2011

51 comments to Doctor near Tokyo attributes symptoms to radiation exposure: We have begun to see increased nosebleeds, stubborn cases of diarrhea, and flu-like symptoms in children

  • Nukeholio

    What did they expect? Totally heatlthy people?


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  • farawayfan farawayfan

    And no real attempt by the government of Japan to deny anything. No acknowledgement at all. What a bunch of useless $%&#s. Worse than useless. Intentional “#$%s.


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    • theypoisonus

      I can pretty much guess what #$%s are ! :)

      What a dirty past we have, and I was basically blind to it to a degree.

      I knew, of course, alot about Nam as I lost so many friends there, and so many came back scarred either emotionially, physically, or would later get ill from agent orange.

      This part or ‘our’ history, I had really not been so much aware of, untill the last couple of years. The more I read, the madder I get.

      I surely hope that other countries know that we , the people, do not condone this ! I sure don’t !!!


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  • theypoisonus

    The more I read about this WAR MACHINE, the madder I get !!!
    quote from article:

    The US War Department and American society’s leaders were big on using creepy poison gas to exterminate those who needed to be exterminated. In a cost effective manner, of course. After all, it is a big planet.

    Using atomized radioactive particles that last for ever to poison and contaminate the land and all the people in and around target countries was their idea and they loved it. They thought it was the best idea they had had since WWI – or so they thought.

    The rest of the world had gone through a big re-think on the messy subject of poison gas and its use. Other countries were dead set against the use of poison gas. The other countries even went so far as to make poison gas use a War Crime.

    This was inconvenient, to say the least, for the US War Department’s Poison Gas Committee, now just a bunch of thuggish war criminals, instead of high society dandies. So, the War Department and the leaders of American society on the powerful Poison Gas Committee changed the name of the Poison Gas Committee to the Radiological Warfare Committee. Boom, problem solved


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  • StillJill StillJill

    That was a VERY good rendition of the clusterFUK we’re up against alright,….sure wish It wasn’t Al Jazeera that brings me the TRUTH however,…sorry, just me. Here was my favorite line in the lengthy article from our Fav. Doctor who went all FUKU recently:

    “Although three months have passed since the accident already, why have even such simple things have not been done yet?” he said. “I get very angry and fly into a rage.”

    Yeah Baaaaby,…you rage on,…please,…makes me REALIZE you folks ARE human still after all!


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  • Heart of the Rose Heart of the Rose

    The budget for defense is breaking the financial back of our country….
    Big boys with big toys…….small brains and soon to be shrunken testicles ..no big.


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  • Heart of the Rose Heart of the Rose

    God knows … Whoopie .. love the military..
    Dad… sharp shooter.. Berlin Wall.
    I could bounce nickels off my bed ..age 5.
    How can a person save them from themselves?


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  • theypoisonus

    This is an article earlier in Vets today that Bob Nichols got some of the info from. It was posted 3/28.

    http://www.veteranstoday.com/2011/03/28/from-hiroshima-to-fukushima-1945-2011/

    I had not read this one either.

    @ StillJill Aljazeera is British owned. I find wonderful Documentaries there concerning issues from S. American, Mexico gang wars, etc. They have some good on the ground reporters who do indepth stuff in small communities all over the World where people are forgotten more or less. :(

    Shoot, I will take good, truthful news where ever I can find it these days ! :)


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  • VanneV anne

    Al Jazeera English is owned by the state of Qatar (an Arab monarchy) and is the English language version of al Jazeera in Arabic:
    “Al Jazeera English (AJE) is a 24-hour English-language news and current affairs TV channel headquartered in Doha, Qatar. It is the sister channel of the Arabic-language Al Jazeera….
    “Al Jazeera English is the world’s first English-language news channel headquartered in the Middle East.[2] The channel aims to provide both a regional voice and a global perspective to a potential world audience of over one billion English speakers who don’t have an Anglo-American worldview.[3]…
    “6]. Award winning Creative teams shaped the English brand identity,[7] the on-air studios and its “EVERY ANGLE | EVERY SIDE” promotional positioning, led by Director of Creative, Morgan Almeida, “to extend the Arabic heritage in a language familiar to diverse global audiences”.”
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Jazeera_English


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    • Pallas89juno Pallas89juno

      Dear Anne: Despite official claims that it’s owned somehow by Qatar, Al Jazeera is owned and controlled by UK interests. I’ll dig up the information to verify this for you at some point.


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    • VanneV anne

      Al Jazeera’s English-language television channel is the most followed Middle East media brand on twitter (@AJEnglish), according to a new website which tracks tweets from media, journalists and bloggers in the Middle East & North Africa.
      The Qatar-based news organisation operates three of the four most-followed twitter handles according to http://www.SociableMedia.me, with Al Jazeera Arabic (@AJArabic) second and Al Jazeera English’s breaking news feed (@AJELive) fourth.
      http://www.albawaba.com/al-jazeera-english-middle-east%E2%80%99s-most-influential-media-brand-twitter-378179


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    • VanneV anne

      AL JAZEERA NETWORK

      Contact details:
      PO Box 23123
      Doha

      Tel: +974 4489 7462
      Fax: +974 4489 7472
      Website: http://www.aljazeera.net/english

      Year Established: 1996

      Personnel:
      Director General – Wadah Khanfar
      MD, Al Jazeera English – Al Anstey
      Head of Global Distribution – Roch Pellerin

      Company Profile:
      As the first independent Arabic news channel, Al Jazeera Satellite Channel transformed the media and in developing its operation into an international media corporation was formally named the Al Jazeera Network in March 2006. The groundbreaking channel Al Jazeera English was the world’s first 24 hour English language news channel to be headquartered in the Middle East and is now available in more than 125 countries, to more than 250 million households across the globe.
      http://www.casbaadirectory.com/regional/broadcaster/al-jazeera-network-s-226-c-.html


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    • VanneV anne

      April 4, 2008 11:26 AM
      Dave Marash: Why I Quit
      The veteran newsman says Al Jazeera English’s mission changed
      “In February 2006, David Marash, a veteran correspondent (and substitute host) for ABC’s Nightline, raised eyebrows in the U.S. journalism world when he took a job as the Washington anchor for Al Jazeera English, the new sister channel of the Arabic-language news operation in Qatar. For American viewers, Marash brought instant credibility to the new channel, even as it struggled to find a cable outlet that would agree to put it on the air. Eyebrows rose again last week when Marash announced that he was quitting Al Jazeera English because of what he considered anti-American bias in the channel’s coverage. CJR’s Brent Cunningham spoke with Marash yesterday. …
      “And it is around this time, and I think not coincidentally, that you see the state of Qatar and the royal family of Qatar starting to make up their feud with the Saudis, and you start to see on both Al Jazeera Arabic and English a very sort of first-personish, “my Haj” stories that were boosterish of the Haj and of Saudi Arabia. And you start to see stories of analysis in The New York Times where regional people are noting that Al Jazeera seems to be changing its editorial stance toward Saudi Arabia. I’m suggesting that around that time, a decision was made at the highest levels of [Al Jazeera] that simply following the American political leadership and the American political ideal of global, universalist values carried out in an absolutely pure, multipolar, First Amendment global conversation, was no longer the safest or smartest course, and that it was time, in fact, to get right with the region. And I think part of getting right with the region was slightly changing the editorial ambition of Al Jazeera English, and I think it has subsequently become a more narrowly focused, more univocal channel than was originally conceived.
      BC: This doesn’t bode well for AJE as a credible journalistic operation.
      DM: If the goal is to be true to the idea of multipolar transparency, then this is very bad news. And I admit that I find that to be a higher goal than being a thoroughly respectable, thoroughly professional, but somewhat regional or region-specific voice….”
      http://www.cjr.org/the_water_cooler/dave_marash_why_i_quit.php?page=all


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  • VanneV anne

    AJE – Al Jazeera English
    english.aljazeera.net/ – Cached
    English version of the Arabic-language news network


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  • catweazel

    But doctors, scientists, agricultural experts, and much of the general public in Japan feel that a much more aggressive response to the nuclear disaster is needed.

    yes, i agree. feel the same.


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  • larry-andrew-nils

    i feel stupid… er than usual today.

    is there a big amount of radiation reaching me this last week?

    location:
    http://www.agnew.biz/travel/tripmap-alaska.jpg


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    • larry-andrew-nils

      er yeah, i live in dease lake.

      it’s on that map there in the lower right side.

      does anyone know if i have been getting a radiation spike?… please help… can’t think for self today.


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      • Sickputer

        LAN writes: Is radiation reaching Alaska?

        SP: Yep…

        http://www.stormsurfing.com/cgi/display_alt.cgi?a=glob_slp

        BTW…changed the water in my 55-gallon fishtank two days ago and it now looks funny…milky white. Two of my most durable fish died..an angel fish and a catfish. Hope the radiation didn’t do it, but who knows.


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        • Sickputer

          I guess you can also see why I say the lag effect for big plumes to get to North America is 8-10 days using the lower altitude winds…wind knot speeds are in the 20 to 35 knot range…the 100 to 200 mile an hour jetstream is way up high in the atmosphere and requires supercharged ejections of nuclear radiation for the most part or really super hot particles (which we have certainly seen) to rise into its path.

          More on wind patterns: an older post of mine from June 11:

          I have been trying to track the wind patterns using other methods and also verbalize with my non-scientific background if the rise [of reactor radiation] to the jet stream is a premise even possible.

          First the premise involves the old scientific fact that hot air rises and cools as it meets colder temperatures. How far it goes up is the million dollar question for hot radioactive ground clouds. Now here is a little background blurb:

          http://www.srh.noaa.gov/jetstream/synoptic/clouds.htm

          “As a bubble or parcel of air rises it moves into an area of lower pressure (pressure decreases with height). As this occurs the parcel expands. This requires energy, or work, which takes heat away from the parcel. So as air rises it cools. This is called an adiabatic process.

          The rate at which the parcel cools with increasing elevation is called the “lapse rate”. The lapse rate of unsaturated air (air with relative humidity <100%) is 5.4°F per 1000 feet (9.8°C per kilometer). This is called the dry lapse rate. This means for each 1000 feet increase in elevation, the air temperature will decrease 5.4°F.

          Since cold air can hold less water vapor than warm air, some of the vapor will condense onto tiny clay and salt particles called condensation nuclei. The reverse is also true.

          As a parcel of air sinks it encounters increasing pressure so it is squeezed inward.
          This adds heat to the parcel so it warms as it sinks. Warm air can hold more water vapor than cold air, so clouds tend to evaporate as air sinks"

          June 12th post continued:

          As the massive superheated cloud obscured the plant during the 7 hour time frame ending about 4 AM Japanese time the hot cloud had the heat potential to rise easily 20,000 feet (less than the height of Mt. McKinley, to the lower edges of the jetstream)…at that point it is still over 50 degrees hot in the lower zone of the jetstream wind movement. The radioactive atmospheric particles start cooling more as they hit the faster area of the jetstream at 32,000 feet (a little above Mt. Everest height) and now lose temperature rapidly and may latch onto other windblown particles. Ready to fall when opportunities and conditions arise.

          At that point the toxic cloud (maybe cirrus wisps in shape) is zooming eastward through the Northern jetstream rapidly. How fast can it travel this time of the year? Well, it’s nearly summer and temperatures are warmer up in the jetstream and below compared to fall and winter and early spring. Zooming along the jetstream helps shape and direct the path of typhoons and hurricanes.

          Oh yeah…they just developed that knowledge not too many years ago.
          Data on the Internet does not abound for jetstream speeds. NASA probably knows better than anyone, but sharing is another thing. So for the jetstream movement this week in the Pacific region let’s turn to someone who appreciates wind…our surfer friends:

          http://www.stormsurfing.com/cgi/display_alt.cgi?a=npac_250

          Now looking at that I am guessing a rough speed range of between 75 to 100 miles per hour for the west coast of America. That’s significant because lower speed ground winds may meander at about 20 mph as they have little resistance in the ocean, but not as much energy as the jetstream. So at 20 MPH the front edge of the plume might arrive at Seattle (4,615 miles away from the nuclear plant) in well over 200 hours or about that 8 day lag so many experts claim.

          BTW, you can measure your distance from Fukushima at the URL below. It seems to have received a lot of hits lately by how fast it auto fills as you type. *;-)

          http://www.freemaptools.com/how-far-is-it-between.htm

          But if some or a lot of the ugly cloud that just literally boiled out of the plant on Friday did make it up to the jetstream then the time it takes to arrive in Seattle now becomes much quicker…46 hours for the 100 MPH wind and 62 hours for the 75 mile sustained winds. That potentially puts the beginnings of the plume in Seattle early Sunday morning at 4 AM with sustained flow for seven hours or so. If it was the slower jetstream model then later Sunday night the leading edge will pass over Seattle. I guess you can figure your jetstream impact for your city or town based on your time zone difference from Seattle.

          Now that doesn’t mean the bad seeds will drop out evenly and descend to earth in a uniform plume. That’s too tidy with the vagaries of the earth’s atmosphere. Side winds, storms, other vapors, all these things can make one place become the proverbial hotspot dumping area and another spot adjacent remains fairly pristine (for now), But one thing is for sure, the cloud is coming and it will not all drop in the government-vaunted “vast” ocean.

          Take care,
          SP


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        • larry-andrew-nils

          well that sucks bigtime.

          it actually looks to be coming to my exact location first… then it goes everywhere else.

          i have had an activated charcoal filter going since the first week of the blast… hope it helps me to not die.

          cheers Sick puter.
          i also hope you live too.


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          • Heart of the Rose Heart of the Rose

            @Sickputer..I have posted Nuckelchens stuff from last night . twice today…and look at the number of views.
            Then.. people complain they don’t know what’s going on…geeze.


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        • bigisland bigisland

          yes catfish is most durable, scary killed the catfish. where you be?


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          • Sickputer

            West Texas.

            The Guy Fawkes mask comes off this weekend…*;-) I think the bureacrats and technocrats will soon have much more to worry about than me.

            I feel we are soon coming to the climactic ending of a beyond tragic story for Japan and the beginning of new worries for eastern Eurasia and the entire globe.

            Cheers,

            SP


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  • arclight arclight

    NEWSFLASH
    to all men with testicles and all women with an interest in said testicles, i have this to say!

    sulphur 35 and testicles dont mix well

    this subject needs no futher clarification…watch or better yet read
    pd james
    children of men :(


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  • arclight arclight

    couple of maybe on topic links here

    mid to acute poisoning symptoms
    •Bleeding from the nose, mouth, gums, and rectum
    •Bloody stool
    •Bruising
    •Dehydration
    •Diarrhea
    •Fainting
    •Fatigue
    •Hair loss
    •Inflammation of exposed areas (redness, tenderness, swelling, bleeding)
    •Mouth ulcers
    •Nausea and vomiting
    •Open sores on the skin
    •Skin burns (redness, blistering)
    •Sloughing of skin
    •Ulcers in the esophagus, stomach or intestines
    •Vomiting blood
    •Weakness

    http://adam.about.net/encyclopedia/firstaid/Radiation-sickness.htm

    chronic symptoms

    The symptoms of chronic radiation sickness vary according to the dose and the duration of radiation exposed. The general symptoms include: recurrent infections, low grade fever, loss of appetite, weakness and fatigue, fainting, dehydration, inflammation (swelling, redness or tenderness of tissues), anemia, unhealed open wounds, hair loss, bruises, and skin burns. Large amounts of or long term exposure can cause birth defects and cancer.

    Treatment usually focuses on the reduction of symptoms. The Mayo Clinic staff is also concerned about bacterial infections. However, there is no mention of yeast disorders.

    http://drjsbest.wordpress.com/2011/03/22/symptoms-of-chronic-radiation-sickness/
    and this

    acute effects

    The dose of radiation exposure determines the type of symptoms and the time of their onset. Even relatively low doses of radiation may be accompanied by the rapid onset of nausea, vomiting, skin reddening, tiredness, and fever. Larger doses can cause rapid death.

    Intermediate amounts of exposure can result in the symptoms of radiation sickness over a period of several months. These symptoms result from:

    •Bone marrow damage which leads to infections from low white blood cells, bleeding from low blood platelets, and tiredness from decreased red blood cells.
    •Damage to the gastrointestinal tract may cause nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and loss of appetite.
    •Effects on the nervous system which include diminished consciousness, headache, and dizziness.
    •Skin irradiation leads to extreme reddening, blisters, and ulceration.
    Supportive measures, such as blood transfusions and antibiotics, are the only treatment options for radiation sickness.

    And Chronic effects of lower doses of radiation

    “Exposure to radiation can produce genetic damage and increase the risk of both malignant and benign tumors. Except for avoiding radiation exposure, the only possible preventive measure is to protect against thyroid cancer.
    The thyroid gland concentrates dietary iodine and uses it to make thyroid hormones; and radioactive iodine is one of the byproducts of a nuclear explosion. Because the thyroid is extremely sensitive to radiation, uptake of large amount of radioactive iodine can result in benign nodules and thyroid cancer. The risk is greatest for younger individuals. Administration of potassium iodide tablets immediately after a massive exposure to radioactive iodine can block its uptake and protect against thyroid cancer.

    Daily administration of iodide pills can also protect against chronic exposure to radioactive iodine.”

    http://health.yahoo.net/experts/managinghealthcare/acute-and-chronic-dangers-excessive-radiation


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    • arclight arclight

      oh and anybody know anything about antibiotics and over using them? not my field….but i suspect that some areas should be evacuated….these measures will not cut it im afraid! :(


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    • arclight arclight

      and this from above report

      “Although three months have passed since the accident already, why have even such simple things have not been done yet?” he said. “I get very angry and fly into a rage.”

      According to Kodama, the major problem caused by internal radiation exposure is the generation of cancer cells as the radiation causes unnatural cellular mutation.

      “Radiation has a high risk to embryos in pregnant women, juveniles, and highly proliferative cells of people of growing ages. Even for adults, highly proliferative cells, such as hairs, blood, and intestinal epithelium cells, are sensitive to radiation.”


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  • Anthony Anthony

    Radiation tests urged for sockeye salmon
    By Carlito Pablo, August 18, 2011
    Marine biologist Alexandra Morton sees a need to test returning sockeye salmon for radiation from Japan’s Fukushima nuclear disaster.

    “There was a large release of radioactive material in the water and in the air,” Morton told the Straight in a phone interview from her home on Malcolm Island. “I suspect that this generation of sockeye were out of the way, probably on their way home. But my sense of this is we need to test everywhere we can. As soon as I heard about this, I covered my gardens. I suspect that government doesn’t know how to deal with this, and in the face of it they just don’t want us to know.”

    An estimated four million sockeye have started coming back to the Fraser River, and people in the fishing industry are catching them.

    Ernie Crey, fisheries advisor to the Sto:lo Tribal Council, agrees with Morton. “I think it’s a practical idea,” Crey told the Straight by phone. Asked if the returning fish are safe, he said: “I don’t know. This is a good question.”

    However, Crey doesn’t expect the federal government to go ahead and test salmon for radiation. “That’s not something DFO [Fisheries and Oceans Canada] is going to voluntarily do or Health Canada or Environment Canada,” he said.

    Responding by email to a query by the Straight, Fisheries and Oceans spokesperson Lara Sloan wrote that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency “would be responsible for deciding what fish for consumption would need to be tested for food safety”.

    CFIA spokesperson Mark Clarke said the agency could not comment by the Straight ’s deadline.

    According to Morton, sockeye are known to go as far out as the Bering Sea, and from there, swim back across the Pacific Ocean. “So they have to turn homewards at some point…but also they’re right out in the open Pacific…and they go on a big circle there,” she said. “They’re eating plankton that’s eating smaller things.”

    Should sockeye salmon be tested for radiation from Japan’s nuclear disaster?

    Voting results say 93% SAY YES TO TESTING!!!!

    http://www.straight.com/article-425661/vancouver/radiation-tests-urged-sockeye-salmon


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  • dog_days

    As always, a wealth of information from the commenters at this site.

    That is a compliment to all of you.

    Every guy’s heard of “blue balls”, it looks like the new trend will be “brightly glowing neon green balls”.

    Wish it were funny.

    On an unrelated note: I’ve got the scanner on and there’s a pretty big brush fire in this county. Fire teams from all around, 3 choppers, and 2 heavy forest service tanker planes. The smoke on the horizon looks like a cold front moving in.


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  • pg

    Anyone show those type symptoms will most likely be sterile. Young ladies will have radiation in their breast milk, and those that can have children, can expect deformities.

    this pisses me off


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  • Sickputer

    Time lapse….

    http://www.youtube.com/fuku1live#p/u/0/QwCb2-Jan5s

    Look at the baby crane fishing around reactor 1 for the first 2 minutes (trying to hook the Blob?)

    Hah…then look at the time 2:00 to 2:15. Looks like baby crane was sucked down and melted by the Blob. *;-)


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  • Clocka

    The doctors better keep their mouth shut before the yakuza comes in to destroy their practice, and take a finger or two from their hands.


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