FORUM: Alternative Energy — Converting to clean, renewable energy sources

Published: September 4th, 2012 at 12:01 am ET
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To get things started, here are some links regarding the work of Stanford professor Dr. Mark Z. Jacobson

  1. A path to sustainable energy by 2030 (Scientific American, November 2009) (pdf).
  2. Providing all global energy with wind, water and solar power, Part I: Technologies, energy resources, quantities and areas of infrastructure, and materials (Energy Policy, 2011) (pdf-Part I)
  3. Providing all global energy with wind, water and solar power, Part II: Reliability, system and transmission costs, and policies (Energy Policy, 2011) (pdf-Part II)
  4. Spreadsheet accompanying Parts I and II (xls-Spreadsheet)
  5. Energy and Environmental Science article ranking energy solutions to global warming, air pollution, and energy security (link)
  6. Studies on matching hourly and peak demand by combining renewables (link)
  7. Studies on wind energy resources and transmission (link)
  8. April 20, 2012 Tri-Agency (NSF-NOAA-NASA) PI Meeting Presentation (pptx)
  9. November 14, 2011 HEAL Utah Presentation (pptx) (video)
  10. May 16, 2011 Seminar, Woods Institute for the Environment (video)
  11. February 4, 2011 Seminar, Cornell University (video)
  12. January 13, 2011 Stanford Grid Integration Workshop Presentation (pptx)
  13. TED/CNN debates on renewables versus nuclear (link)
  14. April 1, 2008 U.S. House of Representatives hearing. Rep. Jay Inslee tells Exxon-Mobil executive that the vision in the “Renewable Energy Solution to Global Warming” by the Atmosphere/Energy Program at Stanford University is “one that the United States really needs” (starting at 1:35:00 in hearing video) (video) (transcript)
  15. February 7, 2012 op-ed (invited), “Securing public health forever with clean energy” (link)

h/t chemfood, MaidenHeaven

Published: September 4th, 2012 at 12:01 am ET
By
Email Article Email Article
626 comments

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626 comments to FORUM: Alternative Energy — Converting to clean, renewable energy sources

  • Jebus Jebus

    Nuclear Power Stations Could be Converted to Generate Wind Power

    Solar Wind Energy’s Solar Wind Downdraft Tower uses far less space and, as the name suggests, generates an internal downdraft, placing wind turbines at the base to generate wind power. A fine mist of continuously-recycle water cools the air, making it denser than the hot air outside the tower, generating wind speeds of up to 50 mph. The company figures that the overall yearly power output of a test tower in San Luis, Arizona, will be around 435 MWh.

    The design of the wind tower got me thinking, especially when placed side-by-side with nuclear reactor cooling towers. Nuclear cooling towers are updraft towers, which take hot reactor cooling water and blast it into the center of the cooling tower. This heats up the air, making it less dense than the air outside the tower. The warm air rises, and the partial vacuum created pulls in cooler air from the bottom of the tower. Could nuclear power station cooling towers be adapted for use as downdraft, or even updraft, wind power generators?

    http://www.greenoptimistic.com/2014/06/19/nuclear-power-stations-converted-generate-wind-power/#.U6e2cXZOliI


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  • obewanspeaks obewanspeaks

    Of course they could be.. :) The world could stop this Nuclear Shit on a dime and it would not miss a beat.

    We must shut all the Nuclear down now while we still can..


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  • In general, there's considerable risk of growing a lot of mold in your house by venting a dryer inside (gas or electric).

    The intake and exhaust vents for a gas dryer are closely regulated –and for good reason.

    I've heard of heat exchanger efforts with electric dryers:

    > http://ixian.ca/airtoair/exchanger.htm

    > http://www.energydepot.com/RPUcom/library/MISC002.asp

    –but even that's problematic, due to dust and moisture.

    The dehumidifier option seems safer and saner. Ours is a minimal 30 pint/day unit (400 watts) which currently sells for about $160.

    The old dryer can be left in place (legally installed) for when you're in a hurry.


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