French Physicist: Fukushima spent fuel pools miraculously survived — Unit No. 4 a constant source of worry (AUDIO)

Published: July 20th, 2012 at 11:05 am ET
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17 comments


June 26, 2012 report broadcast on French radio translated by Le blog de Fukushima:

Jean-Louis Basdevant, a physicist, research director at CNRS (Centre national de recherche scientifique): At this very moment, i.e. June 25, 2012 [the reactor no.4 building] is a constant source of worry because these pools that sit 30 meters above ground and have miraculously survived contain a large quantity of radioactive rods.

h/t TepcoSievert

Listen to the report in French here

Published: July 20th, 2012 at 11:05 am ET
By

17 comments

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17 comments to French Physicist: Fukushima spent fuel pools miraculously survived — Unit No. 4 a constant source of worry (AUDIO)

  • Jebus Jebus

    Did you know, France has 58 nuclear reactors?

    In February 2012 President Sarkozy decided to extend the life of existing nuclear reactors beyond 40 years, following the Court of Audit decision that this is the best option as new nuclear capacity or other forms of energy would be more costly and available too late. Within ten years 22 out of the 58 reactors will have been operating for over 40 years

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_power_in_France

    Did you know, France is slightly less than twice the size of the state of Colorado?

    http://www.nationsencyclopedia.com/Europe/France-LOCATION-SIZE-AND-EXTENT.html

    • Jebus Jebus

      I guess thats just what happens, when you go all nuclear…

      • TepcoSievert TepcoSievert

        In the recent French presidential campaign, none of the main contenders bothered to question the nation's energy policies, with AREVA, the producer of plutonium -filled, French-exported MOX used in Fukushima 3rd reactor, heavily weighing on French politics. Sarkozy repeated AREVA's claim that the nuclear industry was not to blame for what happened: the reactors, they allege, successfully shut down after the quake, the tsunami that followed was an unlucky, unpredictable event, but thanks to the industry's careful planning and experienced readiness, the crisis is happily over, and this accident cannot be called a "nuclear accident", it is simply a "natural disaster". Meanwhile, numerous incidents in France have been downplayed by the Safety Agency, and the infamous Professor PELLERIN once claimed that France had been spared by the cloud from Chernobyl. Recently brought to court by the independent CRIIRAD watchdog for making false statements affecting public health, this fake scientist was shamefully declared innocent. France is now proudly racing ahead with the international ITER project which consists in building a giant nuclear fusion reactor of the tokamak type, which several independent scientists say has been insufficiently tested in real scale: they point out that the flow of accelerated plasma in the magnetic torus will be affected by instability which no type of material for the inner wall of the torus can withstand. A gigantic disaster is likely.

        • Radio VicFromOregon

          Extremely informative, TepcoSievert. I read this article today and think it might apply to the pseudo science going on here.

          http://arstechnica.com/science/2012/07/epic-fraud-how-to-succeed-in-science-without-doing-any/

        • Siouxx Siouxx

          France is going bankrupt, it could never support ITER without the World's money which is sinking into it minute by minute. China, Russia et al are interested because the possible intent is to get temperatures high enough to burn nuclear waste thus solving the riddle of what to do with all the stuff we have already been stockpiling for decades and thus will have so to do for millennia. ITER's doom will not end with its dogdy science but by way of the bottomless maw, which demands to be fed money. France is also supposed to be building the equally doomed and cash-hungry EPRs for the UK's next generation of nuclear madness so of course it will play up the Fukushima natural disaster scenario. Meanwhile back at CERN, kiddies can be wowed by the idea of Higgs Boson magic, whilst more money pours down the drain. Banksters ruination of World economies will destroy the nuclear industry and its spin-offs, a final paradox of being hoist with one's own petard. It's sad though to think that it wasn't one concerned scientist or salesman pedaling this stuff who called a halt but just that we all ran out of dosh.

          • harengus_acidophilus

            "China, Russia et al are interested because the possible intent is to get temperatures high enough to burn nuclear waste"

            Bullshit!
            It's not a matter of temperature to get rid of atomic waste.
            You may freeze it or boil it – the radioactivity won't change with any thermal influence.

            What are you talking about?

            h.

    • Siouxx Siouxx

      France's nuclear legacy has nothing to do with power generation – we have too much of the stuff, it's exported which is why most of the plants are on the borders. Power is only a byproduct of the original intent, which was de Gaulle's love-affair with plutonium. If you look at the map of France you will see a notable omission – Brittany, which has just one part-decommissioned, nasty, leaky thing nobody really wants to talk about in the Mont d'Arrée called Brennilis. The whole crux of why we have nuclear power may be purely as a result of humankind's sense of inadequacy and fear which can push it so easily to embrace anything seen as powerful and dangerous. Unlike the rest of France, Brittany is traditionally based on sea-faring and thus by default a matriarchal society. When the plants were originally proposed a large group of women got together and individually bought up a square metre of the land proposed for the sites. The government and/or companies could not involve themselves in the costly legal process involved in the individual suits required to compulsorily purchase each square metre and thus it was abandoned. Nuclear power seems to me to lie at the fundamental difference between those who feel strong in themselves and able to face life full-on and those who are always looking fearfully around the corner. The divide is not so simple as men v women but nuclear is a product of the 50's, with all the post-war macho angst bubbling to the surface – time to grow up…

      • nedlifromvermont

        thank you siouxx for the thoughtful post …

        on this anniversary of the attempt on Hitler's life, late in the game, in 1944 …

        more people died after the July 20, 1944 assassination attempt, in nine and one half months of total war, then in the almost six years of warfare leading up to it …

        nuclear power must be retired and soon and/or we are all doomed …

        Keep it up 'newsers … the world is depending on us!

        peace …

  • StPaulScout StPaulScout

    " At this very moment, i.e. June 25, 2012 [the reactor no.4 building] is a constant source of worry because these pools that sit 30 meters above ground and have miraculously survived contain a large quantity of radioactive rods."

    And, did I mention I like monkeys!

  • And my animation, showing what you can do in 4 Fourth swimming pool in Fukushimie.
    You need to build a new building, to the basement of the reactor building to insert with three new reactors, only to store the fuel. They manage any guarantees when possible earthquakes.After filling all the water also will be a guarantee of the & span settlement.

    http://www.new4stroke.com/nuclear.gif

    Here is how to do teeth stored fuel rods were at the height of 0 metres, good containers, which should not disintegrate at the nearest earthquake…

    Just build such walls as in the reactor No 1, and at 0 m, you can even build new swimming pool only … but the best place for new reactors. They should be ready for new nuclear plants. But who, after all, will start new plants???
    And i will be a little less concern…

  • hbjon hbjon

    What a relief. Glory be to God in the highest. Creater of the heavens and the earth. The forgiver of sins and media leaks. The fuel pools did not all evaporate after losing onsight and offsite power. Though the pools were crammed to capacity with fuel, none of the debris that fell in the pools damaged the fuel. Radiation (even though levels are so low they are barely detectable) is good for you. The mad hatters tea party rages on.

  • Ron

    Sorry to be ignorant but so what is the status of #4? Did they get the rods out? Is that particular crisis over?

  • RichardPerry

    Where are the pro-nuclear who said how well unit 4 reactors stand up, looking back again and again the positive statements are proved wrong, do they get any rite. The one we are waiting for is exposure risk, this should fold by end of 2012 when the number of people are effected by Fukushima.