“Fuel rods in reactors 1 and 3 have melted and settled at the bottom of their containment vessels”

Published: April 15th, 2011 at 6:15 am ET
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Melting of Japan plant’s fuel rods confirmed, Irish Times, April 15, 2011:

SCIENTISTS SAY the fight to bring Japan’s crippled nuclear power plant under control could take three months or more, even if not hampered by further earthquakes. The announcement comes after another day of aftershocks, including one with an epicentre about 25km from the Fukushima plant.

The head of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, Takashi Sawada, said yesterday that fuel rods in reactors 1 and 3 have melted and settled at the bottom of their containment vessels, confirming fears that the plant suffered a partial meltdown after last month’s huge earthquake and tsunami. …

Read the report here.

Stabilizing nuclear fuel could take long, NHK, April 14, 2011:

… The deputy head of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, Takashi Sawada, released the projection by an informal group of 11 society members on Thursday.

He said data published by Tokyo Electric Power Company shows that parts of the fuel rods in reactors 1 and 3 have melted and settled at the bottom of the pressure vessels. …

Read the report here.

Published: April 15th, 2011 at 6:15 am ET
By
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17 comments

Related Posts

  1. Japan Times: Much of melted fuel is believed to have burned down to bottom of containment vessels — At “last line of defense” January 20, 2012
  2. Water level now below BOTTOM of fuel rods in No. 1 — Suggests nuclear fuel is in a molten mass at bottom of reactor (VIDEO) May 12, 2011
  3. Japan Times: Melted fuel burned holes in Fukushima reactors — Explosions cracked containment vessels? March 8, 2013
  4. “Huge Problems”: All parts of fuel rods appear to have melted at all 3 reactors admits TEPCO May 17, 2011
  5. Top Japanese nuclear expert/proponent: Government’s announcement is wrong — I believe all the fuel rods are completely melted down (VIDEO) May 1, 2011

17 comments to “Fuel rods in reactors 1 and 3 have melted and settled at the bottom of their containment vessels”

  • WindorSolarPlease

    What are the fuel rods made of, any Plutonium? How many more layers of these particles can the environment take, and how much more can the people inhale and digest?


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    • xdrfox

      Dear Grace,
      Here is your Inf,
      dark eye brows go up and down,
      Groucho Marks !
      Reactor 1
      presumed that there was a partial meltdown. Small amounts of radioactivity have been vented and some may have leaked. The reactor has 400 fuel assemblies and the spent fuel pool has 292.

      Reactor 2
      The primary containment vessel may have been damaged in an explosion and highly radioactive water is leaking out of pit near the reactor into the ocean. The reactor has 548 fuel assemblies and the spent fuel pool has 587.

      Reactor 3
      The reactor used uranium and plutonium, which may produce more toxic radioactivity. The reactor containment vessel may have been damaged and the spent fuel pool may have become uncovered. The reactor has 548 fuel assemblies and the spent fuel pool has 514.

      Reactor 4
      Spent fuel rods in a water pool may have become exposed to air, emitting radioactive gases. An explosion and fire have damaged the building. There are no fuel assemblies in the reactor; 548 were removed for maintenance and are part of 1,331 in spent fuel pools.

      Reactor 5
      The reactor has 548 fuel assemblies and the spent fuel pool has 946.

      Reactor 6
      The reactor has 764 fuel assemblies and there are 876 in spent fuel pools.

      http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2011/03/16/world/asia/reactors-status.html


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  • bob wallopadonkey

    “fuel rods in reactors 1 and 3 have melted and settled at the bottom of their containment vessels”

    Yeah, about 3 weeks ago!!!!!!!


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  • Cuica

    Why should we believe anything they say at this point.


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  • xdrfox

    Reactor 1
    Outer building is damaged and it is presumed that there was a partial meltdown. Small amounts of radioactivity have been vented and some may have leaked. Operators have had trouble cooling down the reactor. The reactor has 400 fuel assemblies and the spent fuel pool has 292.

    Reactor 3
    The reactor used uranium and plutonium, which may produce more toxic radioactivity. The reactor containment vessel may have been damaged and the spent fuel pool may have become uncovered. The reactor has 548 fuel assemblies and the spent fuel pool has 514.
    http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2011/03/16/world/asia/reactors-status.html


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  • Moco

    I thought that when it melts it makes the cement mush and then in the ground.
    How does it “settle” there, if still fizzzing.
    Wow, how they can spin a diaster. When they can spin it, they just don’t talk about it.
    Stay out of the rain, is all I can figure.


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    • xdrfox

      The reactor vessels are like pressure cookers made of 6″ thick Stainless Steel, So the melted rod fuel has melted to the bottom of these pots.
      Some of these pots may be cracked and gapping down the sides or elsewhere/bottom?.
      Depending where the crack/height/length is and how much fuel has melted in the vessel, will it pour out the crack from side? onto the pit below to concrete.
      Being cracked the cooling water is pouring out contaminating the areas and beyond as well.

      SEE PICTURE:
      http://www.nrc.gov/reactors/operating/ops-experience/vessel-head-degradation/images.html


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      • Moco

        Ok, so they are trying to keep cool with water but it seeps out and thus cooling does not circulate properly. Thus hot goo is on the bottom of this 6 inch steel, cooking its way out the bottom.
        It does not take super heat to melt this steel containment, and gravity has in on the bottom, just cooking away?
        It there any visual of bottom of steel containment, for a brave soul to see if the goo has escaped? Or is it steel case lined in concrete? Or another way is there space between the contrete and the steel?


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        • xdrfox

          There are some who believe that one has already melted through the bottom of vessel and is burning through the 8 to 10 feet of concrete flooring in the out, and this will result in the future explosion/explosions, there may be partial in other reactors with same fate !

          We will be having some fireworks there before long !


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  • radegan

    Chernobyl requires that several inches of fresh concrete be added each year. That times 50,000 years yields a mass the size of a small moon. Hopefully, we can detach it and put it into orbit where it’s glow will be romantic. However will we entomb four reactors? Better hope new materials get invented in a few decades.


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  • Northern Exposure

    Gamma rays slowly chew their way through any and all concrete/steel etc.

    These pools/containment vessels will have to be maintained and added to for decades to come in order to avoid leakage. And of course, earthquakes/tsunamis will never happen anywhere around these vessels ever again. Nothing to see here folks, move along.

    By golly, not only is nuclear energy the safest and most environmentally friendly… it’s also the most economically cheapest !


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  • xdrfox

    Then there is one of the other plants….

    The reactor at Kashiwazaki Kariwa, the world’s biggest nuclear station, Three of seven reactors at the Kashiwazaki Kariwa station are closed while Tepco strengthens structures to improve their resistance to earthquakes. Work could continue at two units while unit 3 was restarted, Mr Shimizu said.

    Local government approval is required for a restart. There would be no progress on starting the reactors until Tepco resolved the problems at Fukushima,
    http://www.smh.com.au/environment/nuclear-firm-says-it-has-no-blueprint-to-resolve-crisis-20110414-1dfwg.html


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  • Thomas Wells

    To help “soak up” the radioactivity in the ocean, TEPCO will soon hire people with sponges. Experts say that if the sponges are rung out into steel teapots and stored in many large holes in the ground, the problem should be under control in some 350 years,or so.


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