Gov’t contacted to test radiation levels of Japanese boat found in Hawaii

Published: January 21st, 2013 at 8:28 am ET
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Title: Boat brought into Honokohau Harbor is a possible Japan tsunami debris
Source: Hawaii 24/7
Date: January 16, 2013

Confirmation pending assistance by NOAA and Consulate General of Japan in Hawaii

KAILUA-KONA — A Kona fisherman has retrieved what could be the sixth confirmed item of Japan tsunami marine debris in Hawaii.

Tuesday afternoon (Jan 15), Randy Llanes, Kona captain of the fishing vessel Sundowner, brought to Honokohau small boat harbor, a 24-foot Japanese net boat with a deep “V” bow that was found floating about 4 miles out at sea. [...]

The state Department of Health has been contacted regarding a testing for radiation levels. [...]

See also: Hawaii Tsunami Debris: Fridge Parts And Oyster Buoys From Japan Wash Ashore On Oahu And Kauai

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Published: January 21st, 2013 at 8:28 am ET
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8 comments

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8 comments to Gov’t contacted to test radiation levels of Japanese boat found in Hawaii

  • aigeezer aigeezer

    There is a difference in media approach now from the older "ghost ship" story – that story assured the public that there was no need for testing, and the ship was destroyed even though people had showed up at the site to try to assert salvage rights.

    http://enenews.com/photo-150-foot-boat-lost-in-tsunami-now-just-miles-from-north-america-first-confirmed-large-piece-of-debris-canada-was-still-monitoring-the-boat-friday-evening-for-marine-pollution

    In this new story from Hawaii, the possibility of radiation issues is acknowledged: "The state Department of Health has been contacted regarding a testing for radiation levels", but in a way that invites authorities to say "We checked, and there is no immediate danger to the public."

    I'm reflecting only on the respective media and government approaches to the parallel stories, not on the issue of whether either ship carried significant radiation. I doubt that we'll ever find that out about the "ghost ship" (allegedly they did not bother to test it before they sank it), and any official announcements about the new story are… fill in the blanks. My prediction is that any investigation would be similar to the Alaskan seal death investigation – "we'll have the data for you Real Soon Now".

    They never seem to realize that silence and diversions feed the conspiracies – or do they? Reread all the fluff in the "ghost ship" thread some time. Here we go again.


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  • The article says the state Department of Health was contacted about testing for radiation. It says nothing of their reply.

    1. Just how long does it take to run a check for radiation contamination? The answer is not very long. Minimal common sense would suggest that this step should be done first. ;)

    2. These reports NEVER seem to have a followup with any 'actual' data. Except to sometimes say, "There is no immediate concern".

    "As of Jan. 10, 2013 — NOAA has received more than 1,400 reports of potential Japan tsunami marine debris… from the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. " – from article

    How much of the debris has been tested?
    And why not?

    What's the data show?
    What are the facts?

    These questions seem straight forward and simple to me.
    Why are the answers always so elusive?


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  • TheBigPicture TheBigPicture

    Anyone can check levels, don't need the government, just a radiation detector. Radiated debris, fish, rain, and air will be continuing from fukushima daiichi for decades and decades.


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  • pcjensen

    Exactly ~ The foll up ~ ha ha ~ never comes soon upon heels of discovery. Government fails to inform to guide to share data … f* them…. lawsuits to deal with loss (biz, homes, ag land) health… ooooohhwheee long term cancer, organ, leukemia care etc… class action… Just review a few Chernobyl health science papers/videos, then amplify that over a longer period of years than to date for Chernobyl… then decide – is humanity worth the cost? #ShutThemAll down.


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  • ShutItAllDown

    "We checked, and there is no immediate danger to the public."

    Watch for that phrase. An object could be coated in radioactive particles, yet the govt does not lie when it says "We checked, and there is no immediate danger to the public" as you don't die immediately from medium level radioactive particle consumption.

    "We checked, and there is no danger to the public." = radiation not detected.

    "We checked, and there is no immediate danger to the public." = radiation detected but we don't want you to figure that out.


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    • aigeezer aigeezer

      ShutItAllDown, you're right, but they can mislead in subtler ways also.

      For example, looking more deeply into your (honorable version) ""We checked, and there is no danger to the public." = radiation not detected".

      There is a possibility of mischief versions with implicit endings like: "= radiation not detected because we didn't use the right tools", or "we didn't look long enough", or (as in Japan) "we had people scour the site clean before we looked", or "we thought milli was micro", or "we changed the significance thresholds", or "we missed a decimal point", or "we looked in the wrong places"… on and on, with always the simple possibility "we lied".

      Have they ever lied to use before?

      I can never understand how we (the public) always let them ("the authorities") have secrets from the public on issues of great public concern, given that they work for the public, ostensibly doing public business.

      In a perfect world, they would publish their raw data and their methodologies and let an informed public decide the significance of the numbers.

      No kidding – they can mislead us in dozens of ways when all they offer is press releases of canned phrases with no underlying data or methodology… which was your original point, I know. I just wanted to go a bit deeper into it.

      Thanks!


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  • jump-ball

    "Anyone can check levels, don't need the government…"

    And some civilian testing, surprisingly to me almost none, or maybe none reported, is being done, like this report of 24 hour 100 cpm plus alert level sleet and snow in, get this, Arkansas.

    I suspect that every day there are 10 or maybe 100 localized u.s. areas which receive Nukushima contamination, first released into Pacific winds and the jet stream, and then deposited sporadically across the u.s. in rain and snow.

    One reason why we are happy for now to shelter-in-place here in desert cities CA where rainfall in our section of the valley is less than 3"/year over 5-6 days/year.

    http://www.activistpost.com/2013/01/arkansas-gets-radioactive-sleet-and.html


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