Highest Yet: 300 times over cesium limit in wild mushroom — Found far from Fukushima plant, 140 km away in Tochigi Prefecture

Published: August 7th, 2012 at 1:42 am ET
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August 6, 2012 report in the Nikkei Shinbun translated by EXSKF:

Highest level of cesium detected in wild mushroom

Tochigi Prefecture announced on August 6 that 31,000 Bq/kg of radioactive cesium was detected in wild “Lactarius volemus” (tawny milkcap mushroom) harvested in Nikko City, far exceeding the national safety standard (100 Bq/kg).

[...]

According to the Ministry of Health and Welfare, it is the highest level exceeding the amount detected in “Lactarius volemus” harvested in Tanakura-machi in Fukushima Prefecture in September last year, which measured 28,000 Bq/kg. The Tochigi prefectural government says, “We believe the cesium absorption was largely from the soil, but radioactive materials from the surrounding trees may also have affected it.”

Published: August 7th, 2012 at 1:42 am ET
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8 comments to Highest Yet: 300 times over cesium limit in wild mushroom — Found far from Fukushima plant, 140 km away in Tochigi Prefecture

  • TheBigPicture TheBigPicture

    Radiation in food, spreading and increasing. And all from one nuclear plant.


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  • Tumrgrwer Tumrgrwer

    One nuclear power plant with 6 reactors, 6 spent fuel pools and a common spent fuel pool. Is there more?


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    • MoonlightEmpire MoonlightEmpire

      Yes, the dry cask storage facility that was located near the ocean and inundated by the tsunami:

      http://cryptome.org/eyeball/daiichi-npp7/daiichi-photos7.htm

      It looks like they may have had space for 20 casks, though I don't know if they had that many filled…

      Also, the first picture is very telling…

      Also, remember that fire at fuku-dai in April of 2011? There is a picture of that fire in progress, and another picture of the area after the fire when out (or was put out). I'm no electrician, but that setup just looks dangerous. Now, that setup may not be dangerous if hooked up by a knowledgable electrician, but this is fuku-daii we're talking about…The person that set these up must have been sweating on his dosimeter…

      Further, doesn't it look like all of those batteries are a little too close to the ocean? Doesn't the saltwater cause increased corrosion on EVERYTHING on the coast?

      I've been looking through some high definition pics of Fuku for some time now, and the number of design flaws I noticed are staggering. It makes me think…you know how nuke plants are constantly touting themselves as impeccably safe? Smoke and mirrors. Anyone who was truly interested in human/environmental safety would be able to go through a nuclear facility and completely bury it in safety failures.

      Why aren't we doing this?

      Talk to all of your lawyer friends…


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  • Radio VicFromOregon

    If Japan has 14 stricken nuclear power plants right at the moment, perhaps Fukushima is not the only one leaking. This could give new meaning to why radioactive debris was transported throughout Japan and burned. Spreading Fukushima radioisotope signatures among other radioactive sources?


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    • Sickputer

      Vic sez…"This could give new meaning to why radioactive debris was transported throughout Japan and burned"

      SP: Probably some egghead at Tepco explained that "benefit". But they have been rabid trash burners for many decades in land hungry Japan. No room even for ground burials in Tokyo unless you are wealthy. Thus incineration burns 80% of the garbage. Despite massive dioxin pollution the OCD burners now dismiss radiation with a wave of their arms and assurances of their 99.99 percent effective burners. That's what they told Okinawans. But in reality a massive percentage of radiation is intact as it leaves the smokestack filters.

      Eventually they will realize a new dump area has been bequeathed by Tepco's legacy…much of central Japan. Plenty of room to dump for the next million years. But the trashmen will need to wear hazmat suits.

      Madness in Japan… and getting worse by the hour.


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  • rambojim

    If a human being were designed to see and sense the presence of high levels of radiation,there would be no one left in Japan to blow out the candle and the nuclear plants would be shut down immediately.


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