Japan journalist on rumors about Fukushima workers: “Pretty credible reports coming out — probably from the hospital staff — that they’re beyond capacity and don’t know what to do” (VIDEO)

Published: November 10th, 2011 at 3:56 pm ET
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Former editor of the Japan Times Weekly Yoichi Shimatsu appeared on the Jeff Rense Radio program on Nov. 7 and discussed a rumor circulating Japan about dead workers being kept at a hospital in Fukushima prefecture.

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SOURCE: Google News

Listen to the full 20 minute interview here: http://rense.gsradio.net:8080/rense/special/rense_Shimatsu_110711.mp3

 

Published: November 10th, 2011 at 3:56 pm ET
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46 comments to Japan journalist on rumors about Fukushima workers: “Pretty credible reports coming out — probably from the hospital staff — that they’re beyond capacity and don’t know what to do” (VIDEO)

  • radegan

    “Beyond capacity…”


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  • Cindy

    I wondered that more workers would have been affected …

    Wondering how well they will be able to hide what happens to the rest of the Japanese population living near the plant …


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  • dpl dpl

    the coroner gets to fudge the cause of death if you collect them before the hospital does ,so no doctors available will say they died from natural causes?


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  • Fukushima: Japan’s Second Nuclear Disaster

    Terming Fukushima Japan’s “second massive nuclear disaster,” novelist Haruki Murakami said “this time no one dropped a bomb on us” but instead “we set the stage, we committed the crime with our own hands, we are destroying our own lands, and we are destroying our own lives.”
    “While we are the victims, we are also the perpetrators. We must fix our eyes on this fact,” he continued. “If we fail to do so, we will inevitably repeat the same mistake again, somewhere else.”
    Murakami, whose novels “Norwegian Wood” and “The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle,” among others, have given him a global following, made his comments in an interview with Evan Osnos which appears in the Oct. 17th issue of “The New Yorker” magazine.
    Osnos writes about the Japanese response to the March 11th earthquake and the …
    http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=27587


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  • ocifferdave

    With incentives like these, there may not be a better time to go to Japan.

    http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,2099119,00.html

    “and the lingering radiation concerns from the Fukushima nuclear plant disaster”

    Lingering, not growing?


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    • arclight arclight


      “It’s really important that people know [Japan] is safe again and radiation levels are down,” he says. Ulrich Fiedler, a gallery owner from Berlin who visited in November, said he was touring areas far from the nuclear disaster and was only in Japan for a week, so he wasn’t overly concerned, either. “I was a little worried about the seawater contamination because we’ve eaten a lot of fish,” he said, adding, “If I had to live here, I’d be worried.”

      Many hotels and tour companies are now offering special deals to try to drum up business. One ski company, SkiJapan.com, says it’s giving away free nights at hotels to attract customers this winter. Traditional inns are also running promotions. The Kashiwaya Ryokan in Gunma prefecture northwest of Tokyo is offering rooms at half price to foreigners on the condition they post impressions of their stay on TripAdvisor and Facebook. And the Japan Tourism Agency announced in October a proposal to offer free round-trip airfare to 10,000 foreign residents next year, pending budgetary approval.

      With incentives like these, there may not be a better time to go to Japan. ”

      blimey mate!! :(


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  • arclight arclight

    Kashiwaya Ryokan in Gunma prefecture

    http://www.kashiwaya.org/e/

    http://www.skijapan.com/Home/Specials

    might be useful for our japanese readers ! :)


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  • ocifferdave

    http://youtu.be/k_xGt8g-iS4

    My new EneNews.com shirt has arrived! Check it out.


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  • I am wondering why the company is not SELLING this ‘excess’ radiation as a medical treatment? They could offer low cost radiation for everyone. Have cancer? Go to Fukushima, work in the complex for free.

    Their labor problem would be solved and they could call it The Fukushima Cancer Treatment Center.

    After all, as Ann Coultier says, the more radiation you get, the healthier you become.

    Add a doctor to monitor ‘dosage’ of ‘healthy’ amounts of radiation, and you will have people flying in from all over the world, to get this new plutonium/uranium ‘medical treatment’.

    What do you think? Weigh in..

    Just kidding of course…


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  • fellfromthesun

    The Japan Times has NOT reported on hundreds of bodies at the Fukushima Medical College, like the interviewee claims. It may or may not be true, but that’s not the source. The “credible reports” coming out would seem to be Twitter posts again…

    Search results for Fukushima Medical College on The Japan Times web-site:

    http://www.japantimes.co.jp/gsearch/gsearch.html?cx=partner-pub-4223870936880387%3Axbmt01-kzym&cof=FORID%3A11&q=fukushima+medical+college&sa=Search&siteurl=www.japantimes.co.jp%2F

    Most recent mention was 2001 ;-)


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    • arclight arclight

      well spotted feller
      :)
      gnight


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    • Sickputer

      Yoichi was formerly the editor of the paper and his sources are former colleagues he has talked to by phone (he has tried to stay alive by emigrating to Hong Kong). He never said it was a published report, just his sources and as you mention the tweets.

      Imagine the uproar if it is proven even a few dozen workers have died and our NRC laughing hyenas have to answer mire questions about deaths at Daiichi. Heat exhaustion no doubt will be the new spin.


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      • Johnny Blade

        this whole sickening mess has one solid fact regarding anything accurate & of any value as news=”rumors tweeted amongst collegues with no intention of creating havoc or bring attention to themselves holds more truth than censored & manipulated reports & data”!-I wish I could figure out how to use the EPA Radnet realtime tool right! I keep winding up on the old graphs from June-July instead of up to date!They do this crap to discourage people with novice cyber skills to even try to access their half-assed data!!-probably not worth the time & effort for BS displayed there anyway-I give up,getting overtired again anyway & that’s when I turn into a moody prick so maybe I better call it a night pretty soon. g’nite puter & the group! 73


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  • Sickputer

    Yoichi says in interview:

    100,000 Japanese have fled to Shanghai alone. Many have fled to Australia, America, and Quebec.

    People are overfilling hospitals even in southern Japan.

    A feeling of gloom and despair has descended on the Japanese in the padt two weeks.. Most are now just waiting to die.

    The children are especially doomed as their DNA is destroyed.

    Yoichi’s uncle died recently and his family is ashamed to tell him why because they know Yoichi was right in hus warnings.


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    • I didn’t hear the interview but Sickputer’s comments reflect my own interpretation of the tenor of comments and posts being made at Fukushima Diary and Ex-SKF

      Although many people are no doubt unaffected and others in denial, the frequency of “hot spot” detections by citizens in Japan is truly alarming.

      People following these detections and/or watching loved ones experience inexplicable symptoms (such as nose bleeds, fatigue, diarrhea and weight loss) must be truly despondent.

      The Japanese government’s abandonment of its people is a MAJOR human rights violation.

      Every government that is involved in hiding this clusterfck is complicit in violating basic human rights.


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  • TepcoSievert TepcoSievert

    Criminal scientists, criminal corporations, criminal doctors, criminal officials, criminal governments: good that they are overwhelmed: they will be exposed! Get your radiation meters, make your own controls, protect yourselves and denounce the worldwide mafia everywhere your voice can be heard.


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  • dosdos dosdos

    The old saying, “criminals are those who get caught,” applies well here. There is still plenty for which TEPCO has not been caught, observable from the way they act as if they have something left to lose.


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  • aristoman007

    100-1000 bodies?!? If 100 people disappear in country like Japan this would be obvious. 1000 people… These workers are having families. Not credible to me… I like ENENEWS, I hope that it will stay on the track.


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    • pure water

      I was trying to figure out is it possible to hide that people are missing. If the relatives are silenced by money in some cases, would it be possible in every case? Hard to believe. And what about friends, neighbours, many other people who knew the missing person? Seems absolutely impossible to avoid the truth coming out, at least for me. Or did the contractors search for contracting people, already enlisted as missing from the earthquake? Sorry, I do not know the social, administrative and cultural reality in Japan and feel just puzzled.


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      • Misitu

        maybe my outrageous comments below would assist? I think you and I were writing at the same time.

        M


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      • arclight arclight

        repost but seemed right here

        “Homelessness is a worldwide phenomenon. It has been around for centuries and will, unfortunately, be around for centuries to come. Homelessness affects various types of individuals, some are more vulnerable than others. However, whoever may be affected, the eventuality of homelessness is a daunting thought. Why speak of homelessness in Tokyo today? Japan’s homeless were on eof its invisible secrets. They are no longer easy to banish from sight or mind, and the recent murders of two homeless men, one in Osaka and the other in Tokyo, have done little to raise public awareness of plight. The homeless situation is virtually unknown. Even the government does not grasp its magnitude. This book shows a realistic portrait of Japan including a glimpse of what lies in the shadows of success.”

        http://www.amazon.com/Tokyos-Homeless-Tony-D-Guzewicz/dp/1560725605


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      • HamburgGeiger

        Pure water, I think again. Yakuza is involved or in control of this whole mess. They organize and supervise the work in Fukushima. Do you really think it is a problem for them to organize enough workers that nobody misses…?! It was reported many times that the workers are homeless and all kinds of other poor people, that they are kept away from public and that they are not allowed to have contact with their families. etc. etc. Imo it is quite easy to brush all this under the carpet at least temporarily.


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    • Misitu

      It has been said that most of the workers at Fuxu are recruited from the streets by the japanese mafia.

      I wonder how many vagrants might disappear in the USA – UK – EU before anyone noticed.

      This is not necessarily trivial. The UK for example has no accurate records of its “illicit” immigrant population, running into several tens of thousands at a good guess.

      The UK, Spain, Italy, France, Germany, could “lose” a few thousand “non-” citzens without anyone being wiser, that is, without anyone being able to report missing persons. There are several dozen, maybe a few hundred, sex slaves in the UK imported from Eastern Europe. Thousands of latinos and africans in Spain and Italy. Another order of magnitude of mexicanos in the USA. In Scandinavia, maybe a few hundred.

      I am NOT MAKING A POINT ABOUT ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION. I have links myself with that community.

      I am making a point that even in well regulated countries there is a huge slice of the population that nobody official cares about and the disappearance of a fraction of which would not be recorded. [[Unless the bodies were found by a member of the public, of course]].

      Applies to all DEVELOPED countries.

      Note: “Developing” countries have a better chance of detection due to extended family support and other social structures.


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      • pure water

        Thanks, your comment helped me. Big urban structures are always problematic and facilitate alienation. In smaller communities people just know each other, whatever the administration there does. And the underground structures thrive in big cites, as well. They should be better informed and organized than the police if they survived. I just think that they should know who and why they engage and do not pick people by chance.


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      • JonahW JonahW

        > several dozen, maybe a few hundred, sex slaves in the UK imported from Eastern Europe

        Alas, my understanding is that the number is 100x times that. I heard, 500,000 being trafficked *per year* around the world. See documentary films like the new movie “The Whistleblower,” the 2006 PBS documentary “Sex Slaves,” and read Washingtonsblog recent research http://washingtonsblog.com/2011/09/there-are-more-slaves-today-than-at-any-point-in-human-history.html .

        Yes, there’s a large pool of people who could go missing and no-one would know.


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    • arclight arclight

      thanks for posting aristoman007 have you any links to support your posit because finding stsistics on the japanese homeless is nigh on impossible… any native japanese speakers here that might help clear up this point…might mean a search through charity statistics, any government figures… i advise you to use metacrawler for that one (dont forget mindshare) lol !
      and post some links and thoughts :)


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  • Tepco has a history, even before the crisis of hiring “temp” workers, through agencies with ties to organized crime, ie yakuza. There are stories on enenews. They recruit people and have offices in poor areas, known for heroin, alcohol and other addictions.

    How many people can go missing? Check http://missingwomen.blogspot.com/

    Here in Vancouver many women, all drug addicts/ hookers went missing and it went on for a decade. Not much was said and the women stayed missing with no real media coverage. Willie Picton got convicted with 6 missing while they had names for at least 20 more and Picton had a pig farm and gave away meat that may have come from his victims. He got away with it for years, so it is feasible that Fukushima workers who were recruited from poor areas and who had drug addiction could dissapear. Any relatives would not expect communication from a junkie. You just lose touch over time so if junkie goes missing nobodies calling police. I’m sure a company like Tepco could do a better job of hiding missing people then a pig farmer. I beleive the hardcore poor drug addicts get the crappy high radiation jobs and they are not missed if they die. Workers get sick, go to company doctor, on premises including hosital facilities. Never leave as accute radiation sickness can take 24 hours to develope and become fatal. No doubt bodies are sunk in Fuki harbour, wont be on news and no one wants to check water around facility as place is so radio active. What reporter has done a tour? I think it would be easy to hide deaths and may have happened. God Bless


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  • arclight arclight

    I have come across homeless people in my travels in Japan. I have seen the tent communities in Tokyo’s Yoyogi Park. The homeless make their homes using sheets of blue plastic, cardboard and bits and pieces of other materials. They are neat and tidy. The communities are very orderly too.

    Recognizing the characteristic blue plastic, shimmering in the sunlight, they had made their homes along the concrete shores of the Sumida River in Tokyo.

    In Maebashi, there were some homeless people living along the Hirosi River near a public toilet facility. At Ueno Station in Tokyo, the homeless had set up makeshift housing near the station. At Shinjuku Station one evening, I came upon a small group of men huddling on the steps leading out to the east exit holding pieces of cardboard. No doubt they planned to use it as a floor covering to mitigate the effects of the hard, cold concrete floors of the subway station.

    At Takasaki station, some homeless people were living just outside the station. I came upon a dignified looking middle-aged woman sitting in a very large cardboard box. When I saw her head sticking out of the box, my heart skipped a beat. I would see her most times outside the east exit on my way to teach a night class near the station. Perhaps, she wouldn’t accept my money and against my better judgment, I offered her some. Gesturing with my hand, she accepted it.

    In Shinjuku, there were homeless people living along the main strip in stairways of boarded up buildings located close to my neighborhood. Whenever, I’d come face-to-face with someone, I offered them some money, which they accepted.

    Now, I’m in Hamamatsu. I’m staying around the corner from the Shin Hamamatsu Station. When I leave very early in the morning to catch the red line to take me to work, I see many homeless people sitting on the benches with their belongings. One early morning, I see an elderly man rummage through a garbage bin. They weren’t just living at Shin Hamamatsu station but…


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  • pure water

    Thanks, Arclight!


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  • Erin

    Many thanks to all of you posting explanations about how so many people could disappear without drawing a lot of immediate public attention. From my cozy suburban perspective, it’s hard to imagine that my neighbors (even those with whom I’ve never spoken) could just disappear, and I wouldn’t notice. But if they’re employing people who have, for all intents and purposes, already disappeared from public view …

    This is so far outside of anything I’ve ever before considered, that my points of reference keep coming back to movies. I think I need to get all of these years of Hollywood conditioning out of my head!


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    • HamburgGeiger

      By the way, I know one guy who as a temp worker disassembles one of the shut down nuclear power plants her in Germany. And I can tell you, it is the same over here as in Japan or in reports from france. They hire those who are poor, ill and defenseless, preferably alcoholics and drug addicts. And those have to do the deadly work for a starvation wage. I read it here on enenews and now I have seen it myself – in the middle of germany, a modern country, in the middle of the people, and nobody knows and nobody cares.


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  • bleep_hits_blades

    Yoichi Shimatsu is a guest on rense.com radio for half an hour once a week, and he is one of the best, most informative commentators on the situation that I have found. Some of Rense’s guests are good, some not so good, but Yoichi Shimatsu is ALWAYS XLNT.

    Re homelessness, here in the US there did not used to be any homeless people, except the Skid Row alcoholics (back in the ’60s when I was young). There were NO homeless families or employed people. This is because the STANDARD OF LIVING WAS HIGHER.

    The single biggest reason the standard of living has declined is the progressive gradual devaluation of the fiat currency using the hidden weapon of INFLATION.

    This really is perhaps the most important subject we all need to learn about (of course the corrupt, dangerous nuke power/weapons industry is right up at the top of the list also.)

    Check out the book THE CREATURE FROM JEKYLL ISLAND by G. Edw. Griffin. He also has a website. Very good, readable book on a subject that scares a lot of people off; the subject is deliberately ‘conplexified’ precisely to discourage people from trying to learn about it.

    Basically a worthless fiat currency under joint control of governments and the big bankers — Rothschild (Anglicized orig. name, Rot Schild/Red Shield, of their original loan company to heads of state) and Company — is a very clever way to lower the standard of living gradually and surreptitiously via the HIDDEN TAX OF INFLATION.


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  • arclight arclight

    and these homeless and other workers…

    Nuclear Ginza Japan’s secret at-risk labor force 1/2

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fravQ528jSI&feature=related

    Nuclear Ginza Japan’s secret at-risk labor force 2/2

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YGn8I9FQSwA&feature=related


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