Japan Nuclear Expert: I’m so worried — I can’t believe No. 4 spent fuel pool will withstand next big quake (VIDEO)

Published: June 25th, 2012 at 2:04 pm ET
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Japanese Diplomat urges UN intervention on SFP4
ABC Australia
Mark Willacy
June 25, 2012
Uploaded by voltscommissar

At 7:50 in

Hiroaki Koide, assistant professor at the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute: Tepco says the [No. 4] fuel pool can withstand the next big earthquake, but I cant believe this. That’s why I’m so worried.

Published: June 25th, 2012 at 2:04 pm ET
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11 comments

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11 comments to Japan Nuclear Expert: I’m so worried — I can’t believe No. 4 spent fuel pool will withstand next big quake (VIDEO)

  • The German

    Sometimes i think , maybe the Worlds End is Dec. the 21th?!


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    • That occurred to me also. A self fulfilling prophecy?


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    • BreadAndButter BreadAndButter

      No. Don't think so.


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    • Not so fast. We have elephants:

      Laotian elephants to spend 3-yr sojourn in Tohoku
      Asia News Network (The Yomiuri Shimbun) | World | Mon, 06/25/2012 7:25 AM
      http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2012/06/25/laotian-elephants-spend-3-yr-sojourn-tohoku.html

      I thought at first they were being brought in for clean-up:

      "The Foreign Ministry plans to appoint the six pachyderms "Japan-Laos goodwill elephants." "

      This may sound /offtopic , but it should start occurring to some readers by now that the i) cavalier attitude toward Spent Fuel Pool 4 and ii) deliberately sending poor animals into a known radioactive area might be symptoms of something larger – a collective mental shortcoming, or something similar, that would cause an entire government and a whole world to phone is sick while the planet is in immediate peril.

      A government that thinks to send in defenseless animals to a high danger zone or to build nuclear machines that kill and main large numbers of people must be suffering from a combination of:

      i) lack of empathy to other creatures ii) stupidity iii) cruelty iv) lack of education v) laziness vi) psychological problems vii) other.

      I know Helen opts for vi) but I think it is more than that and is unfair to people who have medical issues that are really too complex to "label" such as we do. I think she used the words psychotic or sociopath, so it must be a combination of those.

      Being more benign, could be:

      "They [really] know not what they…


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  • AGreenRoad AGreenRoad

    Or, we can continue on with the following, and no changes except more of the same, hoping that we get 'permission' to keep on living in a contaminated world.

    30 Ways The Nuclear Industry Deceives Everyone; via A Green Road http://agreenroad.blogspot.com/2012/03/primer-in-art-of-deception-cult-of.html


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  • Elliefan

    The sad thing is in relation to the export of elephants to Japan is that the populations remaining in Laos are not sustainable. Both wild and captive populations are in severe decline with a mere 470 captive elephants and a lesser number of 400 estimated in the wild.

    The country has a breeding reservoir of as few as sixty female elephants (those being under the age of 35). The export of six young females to Japan will undoubtedly jeopardise the captive elephant population, dramatically impacting on the number of future elephant births in Laos, whilst potentially placing pressure on remaining wild populations as temptation to illegally capture and tame wild elephants is intensified.

    Currently the captive elephant birth rate in Laos is on average 4-5 births per annum opposed to 15 deaths.

    The Asian elephant holds great cultural importance in Laos, as well as serving to contribute to the national economy with approximately 9,000 people across the country reliant on income generated by working elephants. Captive elephants are also a huge draw for international visitors in a growing tourism industry and will provide substantial revenue for Laos in the future. Unquestionably Laos needs to protect its national heritage; the country needs to safeguard its elephant populations with particular emphasis on its genetic reservoir. This reservoir is imperative to the survival of the species in Laos.


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    • richard richard

      thank you Elliefan and Pu239 for high-lighting yet another exploitive angle of this tragedy.

      "goodwill elephants" – this is just sick. what is so wrong with these people. sick sick sick.

      Do you know who we can write to Elliefan ? Pu ?


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