Meteorologist: “Very high risk of something extraordinary happening” along coast where New Jersey nuclear plant is located — “Storm surge expected to be highest recorded”

Published: October 29th, 2012 at 4:19 am ET
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Follow-up to: Report: Sandy forecast to hit New Jersey nuclear reactor with same design as Fukushima No. 1 -- Hot fuel recently loaded in pool? (MAPS)

Title: Storm surge expected to be highest recorded
Source: Asbury Park Press
Author: Nicquel Terry
Date: Oct. 29, 2012

Storm surge expected to be highest recorded

[...] Storm tides could reach 12 to 15 feet in the Raritan Bay and 10 to 12 feet along the Atlantic Coast and Delaware Bay, according to the National Weather Service. Tide levels will be moderate this morning with the extremely dangerous tides hitting the shore in the evening, said Dean Iovino, a meteorologist for the weather service in Mount Holly.

National Hurricane Center 2a ET Forecast

Storm surges develop when a hurricane’s fierce winds push the water ahead of the storm, threatening both life and property in its path. [...]

“The entire coast of Monmouth County and Ocean County [home of Oyster Creek nuclear power plant] is at very high risk of something extraordinary happening,” Iovino said. “Something that probably hasn’t happened in quite some time.”

Hurricane Sandy is on course to hit full force by late today or early Tuesday, likely causing extended power outages and wind damage across the state. [...]

Title: Hurricane Sandy and N.J. nuclear power plants: Keeping it cool in high winds
Source: newjerseynewsroom.com
Author: ROBERT KINKEAD
Date: Sunday, 28 October 2012 21:55

On Sunday, New Jersey’s four nuclear power stations, along with another dozen or so along the Eastern Seaboard,were prepped to deal with Hurricane Sandy as that massive storm crawls up the East Coast toward the Garden State. [...]

One of the most significant challenges in the shutting down process is keeping the reactor core cool. Stopping the fission, or atom-splitting, process can be accomplished simply by lowering control rods into the core. However, the heat-producing decay of nuclear materials continues long after fission is terminated – at high intensity for days and at progressively lower intensity for very long periods.

Because potentially dangerous heat levels persist, it is essential that cooling pumps continue to operate long after the reactor has been shut down. [...]

No mention about the cooling of the spent fuel pool(s). For more information, see: Gundersen: If power lost, only plan is to let spent fuel pools heat up… no generators to pump in water (AUDIO)

Published: October 29th, 2012 at 4:19 am ET
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