Newspaper: Louisiana sinkhole swallows another 5,000 square feet (PHOTO)

Published: February 12th, 2013 at 6:30 pm ET
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Title: 12:35 p.m. Slough In Reported
Source: Assumption Parish Police Jury
Date: Feb. 12, 2013

Earlier today, there was a slough in at the sinkhole. An estimated 50 x 100 foot section sloughed in on the southwest side of the sinkhole. The slough in does not affect Hwy 70 as the event occurred on the opposite side of the sinkhole.

Title: Assumption sinkhole gets bigger Tuesday
Source: The Advocate
Author: Bret H. McCormick
Date: Feb. 12, 2013

[...] Parish officials reported another slough in the sinkhole Tuesday morning, estimating that the sinkhole swallowed a 5,000-square-foot section on its southwest side. [...]

Latest flyover footage here

Published: February 12th, 2013 at 6:30 pm ET
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8 comments

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8 comments to Newspaper: Louisiana sinkhole swallows another 5,000 square feet (PHOTO)

  • irhologram

    So, which direction is that? Not expansion to the West? But to the…which direction?


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  • irhologram

    I am not advancing this as a theory, I only use college geology to "think" from, and try to get by on logic, as I hope I've been consistent in doing… When I advance an idea, it's just an idea…a stone to turn…as in leaving no stone unturned. Personally, my hunch is that this involves many processes…inconveniently set in motion all at once. But logic leads me to wonder this: is it possible that the visible connection to the gulf that MarkW continues to point out…may be associated with a rise in upward bound underground pressure that is OUTSIDE the immediate surrounds of the sinkhole?This is our initial estimate of the maximum extent of that disturbed zone.
    From yesterday's story about the "fractures:"
    "At the moment we’re putting in all our effort to try and understand the exact structure of this. […
    As you can see, it flows out from the cavern 3 and up to the surface around the sinkhole.
    And what I think we’re seeing now is we’re actually starting to see fractures occurring in this disturbed zone at the surface. http://enenews.com/expert-actually-starting-fractures-occurring-disturbed-zone-surface-around-giant-louisiana-sinkhole-video.
    So, questions I have: (1. Would subduction, or the idea of "implosion" cause cracks, which instead are normally associated with upheaval? Is there more exact definition of the "fissures" they're seeing? Can anyone take a look?


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  • irhologram

    Do the fissures radiate from the circumference of the sinkhole or are they in a parallel pattern with each or are they eggshell that may be more associated with earthquakes? Are they "cracks"? Are they "puckers"? How far out do they go?
    2).I am trying to source the increasing water volume in the possibility the land is rising and not subsiding….although Rainbeau, who should have insight, says its from very heavy rain. So if it's from rain that has nowhere to go because, as another ene story said "like being squeezed from a tube of toothpaste due to underground pressure…which IMO now looks a bit like underground pressure (fissures) OUTSIDE the area of the sinkhole…is it possible that all run off channels are being blocked by rising methane/oil?
    HOW far outside the immediate area of the sinkhole are the fissures…is the bubbling? So in addition to the gushing, water-main sized "bubbling" seen multiple dozens of miles away, are there also fissures elsewhere? Doesn't the offsite "bubbling" indicate offsite pressure…in other words upward bound, instead of subsiding?
    3). If the Gulf is now, in fact, connected to the sinkhole, how could the area be "rising?" Well, if there is an immense methane/oil pocket making it''s way up from miles beneath the ocean floor,, would this increase water by a small amount in the bayous, as the ocean readjusts its water distribution through the mechanism of the two abutting aquifers, the Coastal and the Mississippi…


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  • irhologram

    Cont. Mississippi Alluviall


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  • irhologram

    A couple of days ago, one of these threads contained a discussion of the rate of growth of the sinkhole. By using the data in this story' s links, this 5000 sq. ft. collapse (it it possible that upward cracking can cause cave in but not subsidence?) = 1000 + 500 + 1500 + 1500 ( with the Dec. 12 "exact measurement unknown,"…but "small",). So the largest amount to date was 1500 sq. ft. divided by 5000 newly sloughed sq. ft. = (I'm lousy at math…a journalist, doncha know?) is a 30% increase from the last two events, but over the life of the sinkhole, figuring 500 sq. ft. for Dec. 12 = sloughing until this 5000 sq. ft. event was a TOTAL of 5000, which means the scope of growth just doubled. As I said, I'm lousy at math…but does this make sense?


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  • irhologram

    So I got to thinking about the geology field trip to Enchanted rock, the granit batholith in TX West of Fredericksburg, more or less parallel with the LA coast. That led me to want to know incidence of batholiths or mountain formation in the whole Gulf region and it turns out, Driscoll Mountain in Georigia…which, incidentally is capped by non marine quartz, Woodall Mountain in Mississippi, Lookout Mountain in Alabama and Georgia, and the Stone Mountain batholith in Georgia…all in the northern parts of those states, and so…not geolically significant here, right? bUT SugarLoaf Mountain in Florida is mid-state, making it much south of the sinkhole…and get this…was formed by basement quartz uplifting sedimentary rock and collapsing sinkholes. In "the isostatic rebound of the crust beneath the Florida Platform. The uplift is attributed to the karstification/erosion of the platform, which is reducing the weight on the underlying basement rock, triggering a process similar to post glacial rebound.[10] so…basement rock quartz under FL and in northern LA on top of Driscoll Mountain…in context of uplift in the last geologic "trend" we know of.


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  • irhologram

    I can't believe that the story of overnight doubling of the sinkhole has absolutely not one comment. But obviously it got me on various tangent searches… Because when all the possible answers have been ruled out, only the impossible answer is the solution… Or some misquote like that. Lol


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  • irhologram

    Ooops. That should have read doubling the GROWTH RATE.


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