Newspaper: Strontium-90 from Fukushima found along west coast of N. America — “Plutonium… might be in the plume” — Scientist: There needs to be more monitoring… No sign radioactive releases from plant are going to stop

Published: August 28th, 2014 at 7:56 am ET
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Haida Gwaii Observer (BC, Canada), Jan 7, 2014:

  • A scientist at the University of Victoria is trying to find… residents who’d like to submit samples to be tested for radiation
  • Professor Jay Cullen said a plume of radioactive material from Japan was tracked across the Pacific and arrived off the west coast of North America last June
  • “As of 2013, (it was) detected inshore along Vancouver Island,” Dr. Cullen said
  • Several radioactive materials have been found, with Cesium 137 the most potentially problematic
  • He said off Vancouver Island, a measurement of [Cesium 137 found] .009 Becquerels per litre [9 Bq/m³]
  • The plume also contains other radioactive material, including  90 at a far, far lower level than was released into the atmosphere during the nuclear bomb testing
  • Low levels of plutonium and tritium might be in the plume
  • There is no sign the release is going to stop, Dr. Cullen said
  • He said he thinks there needs to be more monitoring, especially since the radioactive discharge will continue

Jordi Vives i Batlle, Radioecologist at Belgian Nuclear Research Centre: The Fukushima accident is the only major nuclear accident that has resulted in the direct discharge of radioactive materials into a coastal environment… Radionuclides can also become biologically concentrated. There is ample evidence of this for I, Cs, Pu, and Am in many species of marine biota… Cs will tend to accumulate in fish… Pu and Am will tend to accumulate in benthic crustaceans and mollusks… potentially protracted times of elimination after the initial influx of radioactivity has dispersed from the area [should be accounted for]… irregular pulses of radioactivity [may have been released into] the marine environment [and] ambient concentrations could vary rapidly… Conservative screening approaches based on equilibrium concentration factors may therefore be inadequate. Such a situation calls for… models that are capable of calculating time-integrated dose for a pulsed release of radioactivity… Little is known regarding long-term effect to entire populations, a limitation that is unlikely to be resolved in the near future… accidental radiological releases pose particular challenges to the evaluation or impact in marine ecosystems [such as] scarcity of data from previous accidents, and another is the scarcity or information on how radiation affects interconnected populations of marine biota. Yet another challenge is the dynamic nature of the possible releases… the complexity of the marine environment [has] potential for local concentration and long-range dispersion.

See also: Swiss Journalist: Marine biologists now telling me there's been a change in radioactive material coming from Fukushima -- More and more strontium being detected in samples, not just cesium -- Is gov't testing for it... is it in our food? (VIDEO)

Published: August 28th, 2014 at 7:56 am ET
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310 comments

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310 comments to Newspaper: Strontium-90 from Fukushima found along west coast of N. America — “Plutonium… might be in the plume” — Scientist: There needs to be more monitoring… No sign radioactive releases from plant are going to stop

  • Ki11more Ki11more

    Could this song have been penned about the nuke industry, the douche bag criminal apologists and obfuscater's, the paid for shill's and troll's who try to derail the narrative against their entire murderous trade….

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiore9Z5iUg

    either way its a great tune…. gets me thinking…


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  • dan dan

    True.
    Years ago on my birthday, someone bought me five acres of prime land on the moon. I still have the deeds somewhere.
    Thinking this might be a great time to pack a tent and go try growing some carrots on it.

    * Note to self:
    Don't set out on a new moon.
    My torch batteries are running low and it might take ages to find the darn thing out there.


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  • Jebus Jebus

    Strontium

    How does strontium-90 change in the environment?

    As strontium-90 decays, it releases radiation and forms yttrium-90 (Y-90), which in turn decays to stable zirconium. The half-life of Sr-90 is 29.1 years, and that of Yttrium-90 is 64 hours. Sr-90 emits moderate energy beta particles, and Y-90 emits very strong (energetic) beta particles. Strontium-90 can form many chemical compounds, including halides, oxides, and sulfides, and moves easily through the environment.

    How do people come in contact with strontium-90?

    Everyone is exposed to small amounts of strontium-90, since it is widely dispersed in the environment and the food chain. Dietary intake of Sr-90, however, has steadily fallen over the last 30 years with the suspension of nuclear weapons testing. People who live near or work in nuclear facilities may have increased exposure to Sr-90. The greatest concern would be the exposures from an accident at a nuclear reactor, or an accident involving high-level wastes.


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  • Jebus Jebus

    How can strontium-90 affect people's health?

    Strontium-90 is chemically similar to calcium, and tends to deposit in bone and blood-forming tissue (bone marrow). Thus, strontium-90 is referred to as a "bone seeker." Internal exposure to Sr-90 is linked to bone cancer, cancer of the soft tissue near the bone, and leukemia.

    Risk of cancer increases with increased exposure to Sr-90. The risk depends on the concentration of Sr-90 in the environment, and on the exposure conditions.

    http://www.epa.gov/radiation/radionuclides/strontium.html


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  • Jebus Jebus

    "The greatest concern would be the exposures from an accident at a nuclear reactor, or an accident involving high-level wastes."


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  • Jebus Jebus

    "The greatest concern would be the exposures from an accident at a nuclear reactor, or an accident involving high-level wastes." – EPA


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  • Jebus Jebus

    I hear an echo, slowly fading away, into the future…

    "The greatest concern would be the exposures from an accident at a nuclear reactor, or an accident involving high-level wastes."


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  • Nick

    Nuclear scientist:
    This speck of plutonium is not going to kill you, I have it safely sequestered in this lead box.

    Concerned Californian from Marin County who eats only organic anything:
    But I have been eating arugula grown with seaweed. Am I safe?

    NS: Look, I just study the damn stuff, how do I know if you ate plutonium laced arugula grown with seaweed harvested off the coast where I collected my samples? I told you, the speck I have in the lead box ain't gonna kill ya. I am not permitted to speculate beyond my salary grade.

    CC: Does radiation make food inorganic?

    NS: You mean inorganic. No, your food will have just as many organic compounds as before.

    CC: oh… Thank you, I was worried there for a moment.

    NS: I told you the stress of thinking about radiation is harmful…..


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  • SOUL VOICE

    Why are they supplement feeding cows in Hawaii boron?


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  • Arizonan Arizonan

    We are ALARMED about ‪#‎nuclear‬ ‪#‎NATO‬ confronting an aggressive #nuclear ‪#‎Russia‬ under ‪#‎Putin‬ as an… http://fb.me/3e9XBi3iW


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    • StPaulScout StPaulScout

      Eastern and southern Ukraine are traditional Russian areas. They speak Russian and the people living there consider themselves Russians. The U.S. has no business sticking it's nose into this dispute. The Russians have pledged to go in and do whatever it takes to secure the Chernobyl Nuclear Facility. Ukraine is too broke to fix it.


      Report comment

  • uriejarafa

    Don't let an opportunity to say goodbye to being broke pass you by! Love sees no color .

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  • Fukushima Releasing Massive Amounts Of Radioactive Strontium Into Pacific, Causes Bone Cancer; Worse Than TMI, Chernobyl, Rocky Flats; via @AGreenRoad
    http://agreenroad.blogspot.com/2013/10/fukushima-releasing-strontium-bone.html


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