Nuclear Expert: 100 years where people will not be able to use groundwater if radioactive water from Fukushima reactors goes inland (AUDIO)

Published: December 28th, 2011 at 6:00 am ET
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Interview with Arnold Gundersen, Five OClock Shadow Radio by Robert Knight on WBAI (Support the “Shadow”), Dec. 27, 2011:

Arnold Gundersen, Fairewinds Associates, Nuclear Engineer

Transcript Summary

At 5:20 in

  • Quake cracked the foundations of reactor buildings
  • Groundwater is coming in and radiation is going out into the soil
  • Tepco building dyke on ocean side, but not building it on the land side
  • If it [radioactive water from Fukushima reactors] goes inland, Robert, I think we’re looking at a hundred years where people will not be able to use that groundwater

See yesterday’s report: Mainichi: Radiation detected in drinking water from underground source -- Over 15 miles from Fukushima meltdowns

Listen to the broadcast here

Published: December 28th, 2011 at 6:00 am ET
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22 comments

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22 comments to Nuclear Expert: 100 years where people will not be able to use groundwater if radioactive water from Fukushima reactors goes inland (AUDIO)

  • maaa

    Where does groundwater come from? Groundwater comes from rain, snow, sleet, and hail that soaks into the ground. The water moves down into the ground because of gravity, passing between particles of soil, sand, gravel, or rock until it reaches a depth where the ground is filled, or saturated, with water. Thats why the [REMOVED BY MODERATOR] are not building anything on their side. They know they are screwed anyway.


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    • farawayfan farawayfan

      Leaking radioactive water is only one problem, I agree. Don’t forget core chunks lying around with rain/snow/etc filtering by as well, and other cores heading for groundwater. Once again as someone else mentioned, a minimization piece.

      What I really think: (with respect to moderator ;)
      I completely agree with you that these guys are a bunch of [REMOVED BY MODERATOR]. These [REMOVED BY MODERATOR] should be [REMOVED BY MODERATOR] in the [REMOVED BY MODERATOR]. They should [REMOVED BY MODERATOR][REMOVED BY MODERATOR][REMOVED BY MODERATOR] everyone who promoted this disaster and now hides it. [REMOVED BY MODERATOR]!!!


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  • Pallas89juno Pallas89juno

    “One hundred years” that they couldn’t drink the water due to ground water contamination near Fukushima–of course that is totally a given and is disinformation itself! First, coriums become more radioactive through time. Is it “100 years” because he goes along with a misguided idea that the status quo can contain the three continuously fissioning coriums? What about the atmospheric fallout contaminating the entire Northern Hemisphere, right now, all world watersheds and aquifers included? All food irrigated by rain or by rain tainted (sub +) surface waters, harvested every harvest season to come is also contaminated with a wide array of nuclear fallout–this will be worsening. The crisis is we’re all being contaminated and the response of the nuclear establishment and government status quos is to, oddly but not unexpectedly, cover the asses of those most responsible highest in hierarchies of status quo decision making, a titular clique of human parasites and hyper criminals. This story is more outrageous a-contextual minimization of the facts to a radical extreme. It isn’t just the local in Japan that is already dangerously affected. Localization in media as a trend or what I call “media localism” is another form of minimization disinformation-desensitization and distraction increasingly popular with the disinformation making set-MSM. Increasing focus on the little pictures, and incomplete contexts in local event coverage pushed as a dominant or prevalent media theme in direct proportion to the expanding global nature and consequences of Fukushima minimum triple nuclear core and spent fuel meltdowns and corium fission perpetual emissions mess. And, also is a problem because all the world nuclear power reactors built 20 to 40 years ago are starting to fall apart. Then there is always the increasingly radioactive spent fuel and high-level contaminated liquids (likely Megatons) stored from 60+ years of military cyclotron Plutonium genesis for weapons…


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    • or-well

      YES,
      human parasite/predators and hyper-criminals. Your “media localism” I call “unlinking”.
      We’re supposed to think/feel awash in randomness/helplessness and see no larger context where the predators hide in plain sight.


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    • john lh john lh

      89,

      keep all these in mind ,100 year or 50, or 10,000 year is the same.

      May be we have another 1,2,3,4,5… 20 or 100 years… Before all disappeared or evolution as happy Japanese.

      In this regards, he say 100 year is correct.


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    • BreadAndButter BreadAndButter

      Dear Pallas, I agree. I just read a study about a disaster in the making here in Germany, where 126.000 drums of nuclear waste have been stored in the 70′s at 700 meters depth and are now leaking into the groundwater.
      Well.
      According to scientists, the daughter products of Thorium (among others) pose a great risk. Especially Techneticum-99, which will reach its maximum “activity” in ca. 30.000 years.

      :-(


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      • Pallas89juno Pallas89juno

        Dear Bread: GTSY. (sorry in advance for typos, written quickly, dog needs to be walked) The German state is using the fact that they’ve called for the decommissioning of the remaining nuke reactors as cover to make it look like to the German public that enough is being done. The proper realistic response (too late for contaminated groundwater for what has already leaked)is, in addition, to commit to the immediate dry-cask storage of all high-level nuclear waste products, which is far more costly and would be a politically unpopular commitment. The diversion of state resources to dry-cask storage would necessarily mean a shift to more of a socialist (sharing) based form of government, which would lead eventually, logically, to the elimination of all privileges for the wealthiest–see Garret Hardin’s “Tragedy of the Commons” 1968. The resources for dry cask storage would probably have to come from the segment of the German population, as anywhere, that hoards the most, their billionaires and others that have never been in favor of the social programs under any circumstances whatever their rhetoric and PR that have allowed Germany to become a civilized state with an empowered, well education, informed middle class. Of course, another problems for the entrenched wealth class in Germany is that full public administration, not just symbolic, with direct public transparency and control [final decision making power] of what have always been nearly fully covert enterprises related to dealing with nuclear anything anywhere, would also of necessity, occur.


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        • HoTaters

          If it gets handled like Communism, then arguably there is no reason for the wealthy and privileged to lose their status, wealth, or privilege. In so-called “socialist” states like the former U.S.S.R. and satellite countries, the party inner circles were fabulously wealthy. Wealth and status accrued to party members.

          What it does probably mean is the citizens (as usual) shoulder the burden and cost of storing the nuclear waste — be it in dry cask storage, or storage by some other method.


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          • HoTaters

            It depends upon how the currently privileged/wealthy would handle a shift to a more “socialist” form of government. If the current power structure were to topple, then perhaps wealth would be “redistributed.” I personally dislike the “wealth redistribution” concept because it generally means the wealthy get more wealth, and the less well off become even more disenfranchised.


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            • HoTaters

              I mean deliberate “wealth redistribution” schemes, that is. It’s a cover for expatriating financial resources, sending jobs offshore, and putting legal responsibility beyond the reach of sovereign governments.


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        • HoTaters

          Would you please clarify your reference to “Tragedy of the Commons” ??

          Will argue the wealthy and privileged NEVER give up their resources unless extraordinary pressure is applied, they are sued and in rare cases are forced to pay, or those resources are forcibly extracted from them.

          Just trying to engender intellectual debate here. Not an attack on your ideas!


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    • Pensacola Tiger Pensacola Tiger

      “First, coriums become more radioactive through time.”

      Huh? I don’t think so. It would violate the second law of thermodynamics.

      It’s more than enough that it will continue to be a source of radionuclides for hundreds of years.


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  • dosdos dosdos

    Sato finally made it official: Fukushima governor demands TEPCO decommission all its 10 nuke reactors

    http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/news/20111228p2a00m0na010000c.html

    TEPCO’s reply did not address this demand.


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  • easy answer as the Tepco chief knows that the governor is the governor of a crippled no-mans-land …


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  • unspokenhermit

    Around 45 tons, or 1,589 cubic feet, of contaminated water, believed to have a high amount of radioactive strontium and cesium, leaked from the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant.

    I recently came across these atmpospheric simulations, produced an American independent organization, that indicate TEPCO vastly under-reported radionuclide emissions from the Fukushima Plant.

    http://www.datapoke.org/blog/8/study-modeling-fukushima-npp-radioactive-contamination-dispersion-utilizing-chino-m-et-al-source-terms/

    http://www.datapoke.org/partmom/a=40

    I’ve suspected for some time that the publicly released emissions data had been manipulated – If the models are correct I suppose this re enforces my hunch. Is there anyone here that can help us explain the implications of this model?


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  • WindorSolarPlease

    I know my generation doesn’t, but do people have 100 years there or anywhere?


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  • Pallas89juno Pallas89juno

    100 years? Ha!!! I think ENE, not the users for the most part, but the admin, are CIA. This is complete BS and the overall structure is complete BS. There is nothing earth shattering in terms of free flow of information being shared here. I've worked in settings where there was a free flow of information that serves the power elite. I know the difference and can tell when an erstwhile information sharing environment is being managed by the office. ENE is being managed by the office.


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