Potent radiation leak discovered: Pipe emitting 3 sieverts per hour

Published: August 23rd, 2011 at 10:20 am ET
By
Email Article Email Article
18 comments


Potent radiation leak halts water decontamination operations at Fukushima plant, Mainichi Daily News, August 23, 2011:

Operations to decontaminate highly radioactive water at the crisis-stricken Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant came to a 13-hour halt when a section of pipe emitting 3 sieverts of radiation per hour in one decontamination system was discovered, plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) has announced. [...]

TEPCO officials apparently still do not know what caused the radiation leak. [...]

This is the third time for high radiation emissions to be discovered at the plant in August. [...]

h/t Anonymous tip

Published: August 23rd, 2011 at 10:20 am ET
By
Email Article Email Article
18 comments

Related Posts

  1. TV: Officials concerned about 400 ft. tall pipe near Fukushima reactors collapsing during quake — 8 cracks found in support brace — Gov’t orders immediate investigation — Tepco unsure how to access area as radiation levels around it are 10 sieverts per hour (PHOTO & VIDEO) September 18, 2013
  2. Tepco: Cesium getting stirred up? Fukushima plant still emitting 10,000,000 becquerels every hour July 24, 2012
  3. Asahi: Tepco’s done nothing for over 2 years to stop highly radioactive Fukushima leak — Water above 1 sievert per hour — Admits work “has not been done to this day because of difficulties involved” August 1, 2013
  4. New highly radioactive leak from pipe at Fukushima plant — Expert: Nuclear material may be flowing from “damaged pipes or drains” into Pacific April 11, 2013
  5. Tepco: M6 quake caused leak at Fukushima Daiichi — Water coming from pipe of Units 5, 6 May 21, 2013

18 comments to Potent radiation leak discovered: Pipe emitting 3 sieverts per hour

  • theypoisonus

    The Three Stooges could have done a better job.

    I’m totally disgusted with tempco and I wish one of the centuries old yakuzi would off all of them.

    There isn’t much hope for all of Japan now, it isn’t just Fukushima anymore! How horribly sad.


    Report comment

  • SteveMT

    The quote from the story that tells the real story:

    The water decontamination system, called “Sally,” was built by electronics and heavy machinery giant Toshiba Corp.

    I checked their website, and I didn’t come across “Sally” for sale. I think that they have proven that such a machine is not dependable.

    http://www.toshiba.com/tai/


    Report comment

    • VanneV anne

      #Fukushima Water Treatment System: Toshiba’s Long Tall “SARRY” to the Rescue!
      10 workers spent 2 minutes each to fix the PVC joint that broke off in AREVA’s unit at Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant on July 13, according to Asahi (link is in Japanese). The air radiation level at the location is 100 to 150 millisieverts/hour. For 2 minutes work, a worker could have received 5 millisieverts radiation.

      The on-again-off-again water treatment system is finally on again, but at this point all TEPCO cares about is probably that these Kurion-AREVA units keep hobbling along, at least processing the amount of water that’s being injected into the RPVs (Reactors 1, 2 and 3) so that the highly contaminated water in the reactor and turbine buildings does not increase.

      Why? Because Toshiba’s “SARRY” will soon come to the rescue. (Photo is from Asahi.)

      SARRY stands for “Simplified Active Water Retrieve and Recovery System”. Well, it doesn’t quite stand for these words, but that’s how Toshiba’s been calling it….”
      http://ex-skf.blogspot.com/2011/07/fukushima-water-treatment-system.html


      Report comment

  • theypoisonus

    I didn’t read that one, but I did read at EX-SKF blog about SARRY, and I posted on it and called it SORRY, as nothing works anyhow..

    IF it says SALLY, it is a misprint and should read SARRY. :)


    Report comment

  • farawayfan farawayfan

    “decontamination” is such a misleading term. Radiation cannot be eliminated/destroyed/defused or anything else. It can only be diluted and concentrated. Unfortunately, this is such a vast quantity of radiation that dilution won’t work. Concentrating it and digging a deep ditch to put it in just puts off the problem for a generation or two.


    Report comment

  • Hot Tuna Hot Tuna

    Rad graph half-baked. 8/17 was 412 sv/h then dropped to record low the next day, now shows 3 straight days of maxed out high rads > 400 sv/h! What’s going on? http://atmc.jp/plant/rad/?n=1


    Report comment

    • BreadAndButter BreadAndButter

      H6t Tuna, nothing to worry about. You know, that instrument failed, and therefore it’s best if you don’t pay any attention to it.

      /sarcasm off
      That’s bizarre indeed, and i wonder at what level “maxed out” actually MEANS “maxed out”.


      Report comment

      • Hot Tuna Hot Tuna

        Thanks B&B, I’m glad I’m not the only one who thinks it’s bizarre. We’ll probably learn the true levels in a month or so when they expand the graph up to 1000. :(


        Report comment

    • Sickputer

      The graph shows it went to 375 for 8/23 and has dropped way down for 8/24. Get ready for a new table when it bounces back above the highest setting on the matrix. Units 2 and 3 have shown defective meters and no values for months.


      Report comment

    • Misitu

      The meter needle hit the end stop!


      Report comment

  • bmurr bmurr

    ” TEPCO officials apparently still do not know what caused the radiation leak. [...]”
    Could it be coming from the melted down nuclear power plant cores ??? Just saying…


    Report comment

    • NoPrevarication NoPrevarication

      @bmurr:

      LOL. I noticed they said pvc which is plastic pipe. Hmmm. How much heat would that pipe withstand? Surely they did not mean that. PVC is notorious for leaks with plain water.


      Report comment

  • VanneV anne

    Big Brother 2.0: 10 New Ways That The Government Will Be Spying YOU
    “As Big Brother goes high tech here is a list of pervasive technologies the government is using to spy on the public, crush dissent, and control the masses.
    “The American Dream
    August 18, 2011
    “Are you ready for Big Brother 2.0? If you think that the hundreds of ways that the government watches, monitors, tracks and controls us now are bad, just wait until you see what is coming. We live in an age when paranoia is running wild. As technology continues to develop at an exponential pace, governments all over the globe are going to discover a multitude of new ways to spy on us and control our behavior. In a world where everyone is a “potential terrorist”, we are told that things like liberty, freedom and privacy are “luxuries” that we can no longer afford. We are assured that if we just allow the government to watch all of us and investigate all of us that somehow that will keep us all safe. But it isn’t just the government that is watching us. Now we are being taught to spy on one another and to report any trace of “suspicious activity” to the government immediately. The entire civilized world is being transformed into one giant prison grid, and many of the new technologies that are now being introduced are going to make things even worse…..”
    http://www.bilderberger.ch/?p=614


    Report comment

    • Ariana

      I couldn’t agree with you more, Anne. They want us to think this is for our own protection, but really it is for their agenda. So many times lately, I have felt like the people who are supposed to protect us are the ones we should be suspicious of. Nowadays, I’m not as worried about terrorists and serial killers. I’m worried that the government is going to kill us all; SLOWLY. Just shoot me and get it over with.


      Report comment

      • Misitu

        There is no easy way for 100 people to keep track of 1000 people 24 hours a day. The only way they can do it is by setting up a historical profile and then getting exception reports: say, you always holiday in Cannes/Florida/Bournemouth/Sochi in August, and you decide to go in September this year in Le Havre/San Diego/Morecambe/Vladivostock, that would be an exception and would flag you up for a caseworker.

        The caseworker would then spend a week or so fitting your case in with all the other cases and then pass an opinion to his boss, would then spend a week or so …

        They can only follow known “suspects”, or, in London GB, “racially or ideologically profiled” [read: black or muslim] communities, so they go for the easy meat. Hence so many false trails, deaths in custody, you name it.

        The occurrence of riots with consequent damage and looting tends to suggest that the current surveillance methods are less than perfect. I might hope that that is clear.

        Having been involved with business systems and the corporate mentality for a few decades my slightly informed opinion is that, as all security costs big money and is always a tradeoff against convenience, all this stuff is just so much a pipe dream.

        Sorry if this is a bit blunt and not well argued but am a bit short of time right now and hope all can bear with me on this.


        Report comment

  • Nukeholio

    We have nothing to fear but fear itself.


    Report comment

  • Ariana

    What I would like to know is this: How many of those Fukushima workers have died so far? “They” would NEVER tell us those things. You know how many firefighters/liquidators died from radiation poisoning… I feel horrible for those people and their families. They just wanted to make some money for their family, and now they will be suffering a horrible death. Have there been any reports that I have missed?


    Report comment