Prosecutors question ex-Tepco chairman over Fukushima — “Accused of being responsible for the injury from radiation exposure”

Published: January 24th, 2013 at 5:06 pm ET
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Title: Ex-TEPCO chairman quizzed on suspected negligence over nuclear disaster
Source: Kyodo
Date: Jan. 24, 2013

Japanese prosecutors have questioned the former chairman of Tokyo Electric Power Co., Tsunehisa Katsumata, on suspicion of professional negligence over the nuclear disaster at the utility’s Fukushima Daiichi power plant that occurred in March 2011, investigative sources said Thursday.

The prosecutors were believed to have focused their questioning on Tokyo Electric’s anti-tsunami measures and on whether the utility known as TEPCO had properly anticipated such a disaster. [...]

Title: Former Tepco Chairman Said Questioned in Fukushima Legal Probe
Source: Bloomberg
Author: Jacob Adelman
Date: Jan. 24, 2013

[...] The complaint targets around 40 people, including former Prime Minister Naoto Kan and Haruki Madarame, the former head of the Nuclear Safety Commission, Kyodo said.

They are accused of being responsible for the injury from radiation exposure and deaths of hospital inpatients during their transfer to a hospital, Ikuo Yasuda, a lawyer representing residents who filed the complaint, said in an August interview. [...]

See also: Kyodo: Criminal complaint to be filed against top gov't and Tepco officials -- Says failures left many exposed to radiation -- Assemblyman: "Nonsense that nobody has been held criminally responsible for causing a major nuclear accident"

Published: January 24th, 2013 at 5:06 pm ET
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30 comments

Related Posts

  1. Kyodo: 1,300 people file criminal complaint seeking to jail gov’t officials and Tepco execs — Haruki Madarame, 32 others accused June 11, 2012
  2. Kyodo: Criminal complaint to be filed against top gov’t and Tepco officials — Says failures left many exposed to radiation — Assemblyman: “Nonsense that nobody has been held criminally responsible for causing a major nuclear accident” March 15, 2012
  3. NHK chairman named to Tepco board of directors May 15, 2012
  4. Chairman of Tepco Panel: “Future surprises” are in store at Fukushima plant — Everyone should be prepared for that (VIDEO) September 17, 2013
  5. NYT: New leak at Fukushima Daiichi — Tepco accused of cover-up April 7, 2013

30 comments to Prosecutors question ex-Tepco chairman over Fukushima — “Accused of being responsible for the injury from radiation exposure”

  • AFTERSHOCK AFTERSHOCK

    YES!!! Awesome news!!! I won't take off my cynic's hat just yet. But if law enforcement is interested in regaining the respect of the people, what better place to start than with a boardroom filled with pathological murderers…


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    • Socrates

      Unless and until there are criminal prosecutions and full financial compensation to all victims of nuclear accidents every time, these same as swipes will e danger humanity.

      Giving these monsters legal immunity and a get-out – of – jail free cards was a HUGE mistake. The laws need to be changed to DISCOURAGE risk-taking by shifting the losses onto the shoulders of those who take them.

      A drunken taxi driver might get you to the airport sooner, but is this the behavior we want?


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  • 16Penny 16Penny

    Agreed. Hope it isn't just a stunt to placate the critics. Hold their feet to the fire! I hope Japan is sincere as they prosecute this meltdown.


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  • AGreenRoad AGreenRoad

    People sued after TMI, and the judge threw the whole case out.. hopefully they get a better judge in Japan, than the public got after TMI.

    Three Mile Island (TMI) Coverup; via A Green Road
    http://agreenroad.blogspot.com/2012/03/three-mile-island-coverups-exposed.html

    Nuclear Reactor Chicago Pile I; Hidden In Open Sight; via A Green Road http://agreenroad.blogspot.com/2012/04/nuclear-reactor-chicago-pile-i-hidden.html


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  • fireguyjeff fireguyjeff

    Never thought we would see this one!!!
    Whether it actually goes anywhere is another story.


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  • PhilipUpNorth PhilipUpNorth

    "If the citizen groups had not been successful, there would have been a 33% load of MOX at Fukushima Daiichi 3 instead of the current 5% and there would have been MOX in the spent fuel pool,” said Kamps. “The activists have saved countless lives by preventing what might have been a worse disaster than is already taking place.”
    Kevin Kamps http://www.enewspf.com/latest-news/latest-national/23123-citizen-action-in-japan-prevented-larger-plutonium-disaster-at-fukushima-reactor-3.html
    Perhaps TEPCO just went ahead with their 33% load of MOX anyway, in spite of public opposition. They might have gotten away with it, too, except for the Great Earthquake. I think that TEPCO got caught using plutonium fuel in violation of their license. But nothing will be done about it. The Government now owns TEPCO.

    TEPCO: What is this rack of Plutonium Fuel doing in spent fuel pool 4?

    http://beforeitsnews.com/survival/2012/04/the-greatest-single-threat-to-humanity-fukushima-nuclear-reactor-no-4-raises-new-global-worries-2019959.html

    Did that license for MOX Fuel ever come through for you, TEPCO? I didn't think so. So why is Plutonium fuel found in SFP4?


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  • patb2009

    grand standing.

    They will do nothing.


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  • Jay

    This is another misdirection .

    The main question is , Did the Politicians Not follow the suggestions of scientists/engineers ?
    If the politicians did follow what the engineers Designed ( and approved ) , than it is the fault of the engineers/scientists .

    Inept/corrupt politicians are a dime-a-dozen and by the bucket waiting in line to 'get in' the political pork barrel .
    On the other hand even Japan has only a handfull of native nuclear scientists and engineers .
    Who will the 'elite' sacrifice ??

    The Oath of engineers :

    " … The Order of the Engineer is an association for graduate and professional engineers in the United States that emphasizes pride and responsibility in the engineering profession.

    It was inspired by the success of The Ritual of the Calling of an Engineer, a similar and much older Canadian ceremony, and is a common presence in American engineering schools.

    Before joining, members must take an oath to abide by a code of ethics called The Obligation of an Engineer
    :

    I am an engineer, in my profession I take deep pride.

    To it I owe solemn obligations.

    Since the stone age, human progress has been spurred by the engineering genius.

    Engineers have made usable nature's vast resources of material and energy for humanity's benefit.

    Engineers have vitalized and turned to practical use the principles of science and the means of technology.

    Were it not for this heritage of accumulated experience, my efforts…


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    • PavewayIII PavewayIII

      And most engineers today feed their families…. by working for a soul-less legal contrivance called a corporation.

      TEPCO execs would love nothing better that absolve any shred of responsibility by blaming their engineers. The same engineers that they would have demoted or fired for opposing or delaying anything related to their on-the-cheap nuclear ambitions.

      You can't put an engineer or doctor in a psychopathic organization and expect them to martyr themselves or blow the whistle at the first sign of corruption.


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      • AFTERSHOCK AFTERSHOCK

        agreed PavewayIII. Referring to Jay's opening statement that "This is another misdirection.", notice from the below link, he's posting the same statement elsewhere. I've also noticed he's not responded – directly – to any other responses to his original post. This breach of posting etiquette leads me to question his motives…

        http://enenews.com/reuters-japan-faces-nuclear-shutdown-for-2nd-time-since-fukushima-expert-trying-to-protect-their-nation-from-diseases-and-death-audio/comment-page-1#comment-326561


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        • Jay

          Aftershock , would " not-being-on-line " qualifies for delay in replying without 'ulterior reasons' ? Thank you !

          Now , what is that you question from what I said ? See my reply to Paveway above too please .


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          • AFTERSHOCK AFTERSHOCK

            aspersions aside Jay, you did not reply to the prior day's responses. Look at the timestamps that follow your initial post. Simply putting up posts in response to what others are saying is not proper posting etiquette. Your responses (like this one) should be threaded. Otherwise, how are all-other parties to know the basis of the points, within your posts?

            And another thing. Why are you repeating your posts across forums? I can only surmise one of two reasons: you're attempting to garner attention or you're simply pushing an ideological agenda out here. There's nothing wrong with wanting others to pay attention, but you do risk being perceived by others as being insecure about your position. And while it's not unusual to have an agenda (we all do to some degree or another), I'd advise against annoying others with a scatter-gun approach…

            http://enenews.com/reuters-japan-faces-nuclear-shutdown-for-2nd-time-since-fukushima-expert-trying-to-protect-their-nation-from-diseases-and-death-audio/comment-page-1#comment-326313


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          • Socrates

            We call such arguments "anecdotal." Is is meaning less what ethical aspirations might be, or what you might do… we are considering what other have done. I am concerned about your apparent deficit in logic. How can you be an engineer and be deficient In logical reasoning. I never allow engineers to.sit on a jury. They have tunnel vision. They can't see the forests for the trees. They are often swayed by arguments of one side or the other. After the trial is over and the verdict is in, they are embarrassed when the deception is revealed to them. Having a slide rule and a bunch of pens in your shirt pocket makes you a nerd at best. You eventually get it because you are smart guys. But just as often, you lead others off the cliff first.


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      • Jay

        As I said Paveway , the scientists/engineers could have Quit !

        Really , taking another job at MacDonalds ( for a while ) and sacrificing a career VS. poisoning your nation and the world … a no-brainer you say ? Wrong , we see the results today !

        The FACT remains that the politicians can ask for nuclear reactors But they can't built them , while the scientists/engineers Can quit their jobs , no ??

        Let's not allow them to fool us about responsability , after all if you agree that a lot of the politicians are inept/corrupt Than what else do you really expect from them but to order nuclear reactors . But that doesn't mean the scientists have a gun at their heads to do it !

        If a fool/idiot asks the scientists to blow up the Earth do they have to do it ?

        PROOF : did you hear of a GIANT international chorus of thousands of scientists raising public awarness , taking adds in news papers or TV , demonstrating in the streets , QUITING their jobs or organizing petitions ? Please show me if it exists .

        And that atittude from engineers that took The Oath !!

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Order_of_the_Engineer


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        • PavewayIII PavewayIII

          Umm… this kind of proves *my* point, Jay:

          "…PROOF : did you hear of a GIANT international chorus of thousands of scientists raising public awarness , taking adds in news papers or TV , demonstrating in the streets , QUITING their jobs or organizing petitions ? Please show me if it exists…"

          You're suggesting that some kind of noble morality in a world where it cannot possibly exist. Engineers are not the problem here.


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          • AFTERSHOCK AFTERSHOCK

            didn't want to jump-in, PavewayIII, before you'd had your say. Jay's apparently still gaining his 'sea legs'. I've attempted to address (to no avail) how history comes into the equation. He's either having trouble with this concept or blatantly chooses to ignore this issue. He attempting to use an empty booze bottle to describe the pathology of alcoholism. He's refusing to see the big picture…

            [extracted AFTERSHOCK cross-post follows]
            "kinda why I don't blame the technicians or engineers. It easy to point to the guys twiddling the knobs. Realty is, they have next nothing to say about what or why something's built. You'd be better off blaming the teachers and theoretical physicists for what came off their blackboards. They're the ones who scribbled the knowledge to boil a cup of tea using a heat source that has a five-hundred-million year half life. With so much hindsight, it's easy to point fingers. Did anyone really think the world would someday end up with tens-of-thousands of radioactive waste sites? I don't think any of them understood that once the bean counters were made privy to the decision making process, all hell would be loosed (literally) upon the world. If anyone's culpable for where this technology led us, it was the imperious politicians. They stood by and removed accountability from the control loop."

            Attempting to hold technicians or engineers responsible for where we are today, is bogus…


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      • Time Is Short Time Is Short

        "You can't put an engineer or doctor in a psychopathic organization and expect them to martyr themselves or blow the whistle at the first sign of corruption."

        Why not? I did. Those that don't, knowing others will die, are just as guilty. That's the legal meaning of 'accessory' to a crime.

        Murder is murder. Now, whether or not the justice system will prosecute it is another matter.

        The DOJ admitted they are giving the banks and Wall Street a pass on the biggest financial crimes in the history of money:

        http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-01-23/assistant-attorney-general-admits-tv-us-justice-does-not-apply-banks

        And from the Fast & Furious investigation:

        "As the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform was voting Holder into contempt of Congress for his refusal to cooperate with congressional investigators by failing to turn over tens of thousands of pages of Fast and Furious documents, Obama asserted the executive privilege over them. The full House of Representatives soon after voted on a bipartisan basis to hold Holder in contempt.


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    • Socrates

      Dr. Mengele was a physician who took the Hypocratic Oath. Many physicians collaborated with torture. Engineers took part in setting up dangerous power plants. Many have signed off on paperwork to conceal cutting corners.

      I would love for you to present this excuse to a jury. Any good cross – examiner would expose the lame excuses.

      "An entire industry can be negligent."

      - Learned Hand, New York Supreme Court Judge

      Tugboat industry claimed that 30 dollars for a ship – to – shore radio was too expensive in trial where all hands went down in a storm and evidence showed that this was the third or fourth such trial in which tug boat owners had raised this defense.

      The handwriting is on the wall, buddy. No more excuses! The entire industry is negligent. Surely, you knew that.


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  • PavewayIII PavewayIII

    "…If anyone's culpable for where this technology led us, it was the imperious politicians. They stood by and removed accountability from the control loop…"

    Don't beat up on those knucleheads – they're just doing what their paid to do. Frankly, I would have to say they've done a pretty good job of removing accountability. Can you see any? Of course not – these guys are pros.


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    • AFTERSHOCK AFTERSHOCK

      yes they have PavewayIII. Fact is, politicians are far more deadly than any diseased whore…


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      • PavewayIII PavewayIII

        Hey, easy on the ladies, AF. No little girl ever dreams of growing up some day and being pimped out to… well… politicians, for instance.

        I do agree American politicians are dangerous. I would seriously consider arming myself to protect my family from them, but I think that's illegal now. I have a profound aversion to guns and killing in general anyways. I would prefer to use cash-baited live-traps to humanely catch the wily rodents and then just turn them loose somewhere where they can't hurt anyone. Maybe like Canada?


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        • Socrates

          Key to bribery is called "campaign contributions." It is a pay – to – play system where the money determines the vote and SCOTUS calls it a corporation 's right to free speech using case precedents involving newspaper corporations.

          Only when the nuclear gravy-train laws are dismantled will sanity and safety become possible. Until then the system is set up to promote use of nuclear energy. Why? Special interests.


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  • Time Is Short Time Is Short

    "No little girl ever dreams of growing up some day and being pimped out to… well… politicians, for instance."

    Like this?

    'Emails show FBI investigating Sen. Bob Menendez for sleeping with underage Dominican prostitutes'

    http://dailycaller.com/2013/01/25/emails-show-fbi-investigating-sen-bob-menendez-for-sleeping-with-underage-dominican-prostitutes/

    The video is a great laugh.


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  • PavewayIII PavewayIII

    Remember when traveling overseas for child prostitutes was illegal?

    And the retired FBI guy speculates that any prosecution will depend on the "…believability of the witnesses and their willingness to cooperate…"

    This shouldn't pose any problem for the U.S. justice system. Who are you going to believe: an esteemed pedophile U.S. senator or some unknown teenage Dominican hooker that says he underpaid her? I bet she doesn't even have a time and date legible receipt or a record of deposit for her alleged services!

    So now all the foot-dragging FBI would have to do (provided they ever bothered investigating since last July) is to track down and publicly humiliate these girls, which will result in their entire families being slaughtered by the Dominican Mafia – just to teach them a lesson. That is, if either the girls or their families are still alive, yet. 'Doc' probably took care of the problem already.

    If the girls had any sense, they would already be half-way across the planet and in hiding. Ratting out pedophile senators usually ends up badly, especially if you're the victim.

    Laws only apply to taxpaying peons violating them, not for U.S. senators. They're too important.


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  • Socrates

    Look, the solution is simple; it is staring us right in the face. Hold the industry and the individuals involved civilly and criminally liable. Change US policy to zero percent nuclear energy. Use Super funds to clean up the mess, if possible.


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    • bf9 Fitz

      +1,000,000

      Take away their immunity, industry won't be around much longer. We need an international blank check for both offensive and defensive on this…one half for "fixing" these reactors/corium problem and the other half for biomedical research to try and undo some of the damage already done and will continue to be done. As the Mayans alluded to, (paraphrased) "our only hope is the secrets of the blood or help from our brothers from the stars". What the powers that be need to realize is that this problem is beyond a "depopulation" scenario and is actually an "every living organism on earth eventually dies permanently" scenario.

      Full throttle on both halves are our only hope, and every country on earth is needed. Lots of people are already going to die, maybe it's a good idea not to let everyone go too?


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      • Socrates

        Yes, "The fault, my dear Brutus, lies not in our stars but in ourselves…"

        Give me a big enough lever and I shall move the world.

        Change a few liability laws and the rats will run….

        They only do it because they were given a sweet deal back in the 50s before the double helix was discovered. The risk of destroying entire countries and oceans should NEVER have been taken on any odds.

        You can pass a logging truck with you family in the car on a blind curve, too. Chances are you will make it. Humans take such chances. Especially if they are in the boardroom and not behind the wheel.


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  • obewanspeaks obewanspeaks

    Such chances should never have been allowed on/with this Planet we call Earth.


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