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Radiation monitoring station data was actually three decimal places greater than numbers released to public, says Japan’s former Minister for Internal Affairs

Published: July 2nd, 2011 at 10:45 am ET
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Japanese Cancer Expert on the Fukushima Situation, Asia Pacific Journal, July 01, 2011:

Japan’s leading business journal Toyo Keizai has published an article by Hokkaido Cancer Center director Nishio Masamichi, a radiation treatment specialist. The piece, entitled “The Problem of Radiation Exposure Countermeasures for the Fukushima Nuclear Accident: Concerns for the Present Situation”, was published on June 27 [...]

Nishio originally called for “calm” in the days after the accident. Now, he argues, that as the gravity of the situation at the plant has become more clear, the specter of long-term radiation exposure must be reckoned with. [...]

Looking at these groups [TEPCO, bureaucrats, politicians, nuclear lobbyists, and academic flunkies] he writes, “I just cannot feel any hope for Japan’s future. These circumstances are simply tragic.”

Nishio provides a blunt and hard-hitting specialist perspective on major government decisions. Here is a summary of some of his major points: [...]

Former Minister for Internal Affairs Haraguchi Kazuhiro has alleged that radiation monitoring station data was actually three decimal places greater than the numbers released to the public. If this is true, it constitutes a “national crime”, in Nishio’s words. [...]

h/t anonymous tip

Published: July 2nd, 2011 at 10:45 am ET
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92 comments

92 comments to Radiation monitoring station data was actually three decimal places greater than numbers released to public, says Japan’s former Minister for Internal Affairs