Record cesium levels at Pacific Ocean sampling location north of Fukushima plant — Spikes to 6,900 Bq/m³ from ‘not detected’ in one day

Published: March 17th, 2014 at 10:18 am ET
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41 comments


Radioactive Materials in the Seawater — ‘North of Unit 5-6 Discharge Channel’, Mar. 16, 2014:

  • Cs-134 @ 1.7 Bq/L (1,700 Bq/m³) + Cs-137 @ 5.2 Bq/L (5,200 Bq/m³)

Radioactive Materials in the Seawater — ‘North of Unit 5-6 Discharge Channel’, Mar. 15, 2014:

  • Cs-134 @ ND (0.52 Bq/L detection limit) + Cs-137 @ ND (0.57 Bq/L)

Previous high dose at ‘North of Unit 5-6 Discharge Channel’:

  • Cs-134 @ 1.8 Bq/L on June 21, 2013 + Cs-137 @ 3.3 Bq/L on June 26, 2013

View Tepco’s test results here (pdf)

See also: Unit 5 and 6 take up the Fukushima Daiichi port water for cooling and discharge it north of the port, directly into the Pacific

Published: March 17th, 2014 at 10:18 am ET
By

41 comments

Related Posts

  1. Plutonium detected underground near Fukushima reactor — Test results not revealed publicly for almost a year after sampling date — Officials plan to pump up groundwater from same well it was found in and dump it into Pacific Ocean (PHOTO) August 13, 2014
  2. “Deadly” radioactive material up around 50,000,000% at Fukushima plant in recent months — Strontium-90 spikes to record level near ocean outside Reactor No. 2 December 5, 2014
  3. Gov’t Report: Plutonium at 1,000,000 Bq/m3 was detected in ocean off Fukushima — “Contaminated waters will be transported rapidly to east” across Pacific — This is “the most important direct liquid release of artificial radioactivity into sea ever known” — Scientists: “Remember, its not just cesium that’s released” March 27, 2015
  4. Officials: ‘Nuclear fuel material’ leak at Fukushima — Japan TV: Record levels of radioactivity detected in seawater — Spiked “more than 200 times” at sampling location — Highest concentrations ever measured in 11 different areas (VIDEO) May 31, 2015
  5. Japan Gov’t-funded Study: Fukushima has released up to 120 Quadrillion becquerels of radioactive cesium into North Pacific Ocean — Does not include amounts that fell on land — Exceeds Chernobyl total, which accounts for releases deposited on land AND ocean (MAP) June 30, 2014

41 comments to Record cesium levels at Pacific Ocean sampling location north of Fukushima plant — Spikes to 6,900 Bq/m³ from ‘not detected’ in one day

  • fireguyjeff fireguyjeff

    Heads up everyone…the chart is logarithmic.

    Very useful for scientific purposes.

    Really bad for public presentations!!

    • GQR2

      FireguyJeff would you be so kind as to take a stab at interrupting this chart for us? got my own interpretation, but its not exactly technical 😉

      This is what they are going to do on the West Coast from top to bottom, they're gonna say opps, our bad, who knew , it wasn't there the day before. Let's not play the blame game though( to which i say it's about time we play the accountability game in fact it's overdue)

      • fireguyjeff fireguyjeff

        GQR2:
        Here is an explanation for the chart that I hope will help.

        Each vertical division is a non-linear one.

        The data is bobbling around the 1.0E+00 line. (unity)
        That line represents 1 (one) unit

        The line below it represents 1/10th
        The line below that represents 1/100th

        The line above it (1.0E+01) represents 10 times

        The log scale is a convenient way to compress a very wide range of values in to a much small "window" for visual purposes.

        It allows one to compress a value of 1 million down to 6 ranges.

        For many applications, the log scale is extremely useful.

        For many situations, especially the public or for business/accounting types, it is inherently deceptive, intended or not.

        The non-technical person is not used to thinking about the world around them in non-linear terms.
        In fact, most people can not wrap their heads around the log concept until they have to use it over a long period of time and get used to it. Even then it can be an abstract challenge for many.

        It can easily lead to one interpreting that little change in a measurement has happened, when in reality the change is quite large.

        IMO, log scale has no place in any public presentation.

        Rest assured that the source of the data was not trying to hide anything here. Many scientific instruments use log scale as the default, as it is expected by the users, i.e. engineers and scientists.

        Hope this helps.

  • fireguyjeff fireguyjeff

    Also note that te detection threshold is about an order of magnitude below this latest spike.

    Not detected does not at all mean "none there".

    According to the data presented, 519 Bq/m^3 would qualify as not detected f(for 134Cs)

    According to the data presented, 569 Bq/m^3 would qualify as not detected f(for 137Cs)

  • Nick

    "There is a crisis of manpower at the plant,” said Yukiteru Naka, founder of Tohoku Enterprise, a contractor and former plant engineer for General Electric. “We are forced to do more with less, like firemen being told to use less water even though the fire’s still burning.”

    That crisis was especially evident one dark morning last October, when a crew of contract workers was sent to remove hoses and valves as part of a long-overdue upgrade to the plant’s water purification system.

    According to regulatory filings by Tepco, the team received only a 20-minute briefing from their supervisor and were given no diagrams of the system they were to fix and no review of safety procedures — a scenario a former supervisor at the plant called unthinkable. Worse yet, the laborers were not warned that a hose near the one they would be removing was filled with water laced with radioactive cesium.

    As the men shambled off in their bulky protective gear, their supervisor, juggling multiple responsibilities, left to check on another crew. They chose the wrong hose, and a torrent of radioactive water began spilling out. Panicked, the workers thrust their gloved hands into the water to try to stop the leak, spraying themselves and two other workers who raced over to help."
    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/17/world/asia/unskilled-and-destitute-are-hiring-targets-for-fukushima-cleanup.html?hp&_r=0

    • We Not They Finally

      They are skimping on WATER when there's a FIRE? Then just mindlessly killing their own workers for lack of safety training?

      And they think that the end result will be WHAT? Is it ONLY greed, stupidity and evil, or have they completely lost their minds?

  • http://bellona.org/latest-news

    found another friendly voice. thought it worth sharing with everyone here.

  • Nick

    http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/search/a?dbs+hsdb:@term+@DOCNO+7389

    Cesium is not a friendly atom. When it is radioactive, even more so.

    Learn about the toxicity of cesium-134/137 then delve into the slew of goodies that Fukushima is belching into our biosphere daily.

    It is all going to add up and make more things go awry.

  • PhilipUpNorth PhilipUpNorth

    "Record cesium levels…Spikes to 6,900 Bq/m³"

    Just for the record:

    Total cesium IN reactor cores1-3 at Fukushima have been released into nature by melt-through of the containment, vessels, as well as through breaches of the containment vessels, leading to a total release of all nuclides contained in the cores of Units1-3 at the time of the earthquake on 3/11.

    Funny that this number is 690 PBq for total cesium released from Units1-3.

    Any numerologist care to voice anything on this particular coincidence? 😉

    • fireguyjeff fireguyjeff

      PUN:
      I shy away from numerology (and astrology, and trigonology)

      Rest assured that it is nothing more than coincidence that the

      characteristic and mantissa are the same.

      My take is that the 690PBq is purely an estimate and that 6,900 Bq/m³
      is a real measurement.

  • 4Warnd 4Warnd

    Am betting that there "is no immediate danger to the…."

  • 3 years ongoing. It's not stopping.

    This release will again wash up on shores in about 3 more years. Some will evaporate and become airborne fallout too.

    The spread and accumulation continues.
    Bio-accumulation continues.

    Vigorous non-biased testing – not going to happen. 😉

    • newsblackoutUSA newsblackoutUSA

      ChasAh- Also, there is the ever present thought of radioactive waste entering the salt water environment and trans-mutating into highly mobile nano-clusters that travel long distances in air and water.

      "Uranyl peroxide enhanced nuclear fuel corrosion in seawater"
      http://www.pnas.org/content/109/6/1874.full

      http://i.imgur.com/HAiRS3l.jpg
      (A, B); and two bidentate peroxide groups and two hydroxides as in U60 cage clusters (C, D). Uranium and O atoms are shown as yellow and red spheres, respectively.

      • HoTaters HoTaters

        Observed to exist, able to be created under laboratory conditions. This time the DOE's research teams have been able to produce the uranyl peroxide clusters. But no one is telling us whether or not they have actually been observed forming when seawater comes into contact with nuclear fuel, esp. spent fuel.

        "Although it is not currently possible to measure the enthalpies of formation of aqueous alkali uranyl peroxide species (22), or complex cage clusters in solution, our studies of the corresponding solid phases provide useful insight pertaining to the interaction of irradiated fuel and seawater. Peroxide production will be the highest where water contacts fuel directly (owing to the importance of alpha radiolysis), and it will achieve the highest concentration locally in the water near the surface of the fuel, where the fuel to water ratio is high, and where water is relatively stagnant. Possible locations where peroxide buildup will be greatest at Fukushima-Daiichi include spent fuel cooling pools and areas in the reactor cores where water intimately interacts with UO2 fuel. We contend that simple uranyl peroxide species, as well as complex nanoscale cage clusters built from uranyl peroxide polyhedra, will form in these environments."

        Wish they'd tell us if they're actually finding this is occurring. Fear porn?

        • HoTaters HoTaters

          Need to re-read the study you cited, newsblackoutUSA, & the UC Davis study. The UC Davis study (I thought) discussed the formation of the uranyl peroxide clusters in the presence of seawater.

          Thanks for providing that link.

          It's important to note the DOE is taking this possibility seriously. But what are the implications? And again, have these compounds been found to exist, to actually be forming at Fuku Dai &/or elsewhere? That's the big burning question, IMO.

          I wasn't aware they can form when "fresh" or non-seawater contacts the fuel or coria. It would make sense they can form, though, if the spent fuel is in contact with ground water, and if that groundwater has salt intrusion from tidal action.

          Hmnn ….

    • Sparky Sparky

      ChasAha, NBO-USA, Add to that the aerosolized particulate matter from the radioactive waste being burned with frightening regularity at/from the Fuku NPP.

      • Sparky Sparky

        nuckelchen's video, March 13, 2014 at 6:30 pm:
        http://youtu.be/RXEpzJ9TrdU

        at 4:50 you will see clearl that couldn't be clouds or normal foggy crawling over da coastline.
        Play it Loud & fullscreened

        • GQR2

          Dawn is just now breaking at the plant. Fukushhh! 5:11 JST.
          Nuck's vid is a very important one. ought to go viral.
          Its right there to see. The reactors burning up, emitting enough radioactive steam,smoke,water,and contaminated dirt,neutron beams,gamma shine to kill all carbon based life forms many times over. forever. No.end.in.sight. The worst possible Nuclear accident to be able to have happen..happened and has been happening for 1112 days.

          • fireguyjeff fireguyjeff

            What it looks like to me is multiple flood lights that got turned on. They are on during the entire video sequence.

            Personally, I really doubt that we will ever "see" any reactor material "burning up", since gravity has been pulling on everything from inside the buildings.

            Sure looks to me like clouds/fog passing between the camera and the reactor buildings in the distance.

            Fluctuations in air temp and density and humidity between the camera(s) and the reactor buildings in the distance will easy cause the light emitted from the flood light to vary in intensity.

            The lack of ambient light will easily make clouds/steam/fog look much darker than one would expect.

            The opposite is true with smoke or fog with a lot of light,
            especially a camera flash. The photo can literally look white while to the eye in real time it can look like a thin grey color.

            Need to take on a conservative mind set with marginal optics on the cameras and lighting conditions that are not conducive to good photographic/video details.

            Just some concepts to consider.

            • name999 name999

              fireguyjeff, I have read in a report in The Wallstreet Journal, and then again today in
              The Columbian that an icewall has been built. This is described as deep drilled holes that are filled with liquid nitrogen to freeze the ground around the plant so water from the nearby
              mountain does not mix with the radioactive waters and materials under and around the plant.

              Have you heard about this? That could make some foggy smoggy looking air also.

              • fireguyjeff fireguyjeff

                name:
                I am not aware of any actual ice wall being built.

                In The Columbian, the story is a fluff piece meant to sugar coat the problem. I have no idea how Ms Raap missed the fundamental flaw in the ice wall idea. She did finish a degree in Nuclear Engineering from Texas A&M, so how she missed the thermodynamics fundamentals of this I don't know. She is likely repeating talking points and has not thought through the idea much at all.

                "They freeze the ground," Raap said. "They drill in, pump liquid nitrogen in and basically freeze a thick wall below ground so water can't flow through."

                What is not discussed is what happens after the ground is frozen….the earth as heat sink will melt any water that froze in the earth after the LN evaporates. LN evaporating is how theLN would do the freezing. Dig a hole, throw in some ice cubes in to the dirt, cover the ice, and magic…it melts.

                So the ice wall idea needs to be put in to the same category as:
                Fuku is in cold shut down.
                Containment was never breached.
                Decommissioning will take a few years.
                No one has died from Fuku
                No one will die from Fuku
                Local communities were decontaminated
                It is safe to got back to the exclusion zone to live
                Smiling people are immune to radiation.
                Nuclear will be much safer from what we have learned from Fuku.
                The Fuku ice wall would cost 100s of million$ to build
                and easily cost many million$ per year to operate.
                Lots of electricity needed!

                My advice..ignore the entire…

            • GQR2

              fireguyjeff, respectfully i disagree, there was most certainly something burning. It was radioactive. I don't know how much you watch the cameras which are limited for sure but based on what i have seen – i'm sure it was something burning up! we can certainly agree to disagree. 🙂 That was not normal fog, it was smoke,there was a large fire somewhere on the plant grounds just out of sight to the left of the camera.

              • fireguyjeff fireguyjeff

                GQR:
                Disagreement respected.

                Well now, off to the left of camera and I am open to the idea of something burning, even if we can not make out just exactly what.

                However, something burning does not mean anything radioactive, per se.
                For all we know, they have a large debris pile left of camera that they decided to torch.

                However, based on what I see from the camera, the camera is looking at the reactor buildings.

                My question then is what is off to the left.

                As I recall, all of the Daichi reactor buildings are in more or less a straight line.

                Maybe there are some geographic and/or architectural details I have missed to account for why something burning.

  • 4Warnd 4Warnd

    NBOUSA: Thank you for posting that link.

    Reading the article – sublime in its understated language and concise analysis. This is truly engulfingly horrible news, as if that were possible.

    As you quote, "Uranyl peroxide [present] enhances nuclear fuel corrosion." Therefore: TEPCO washing and cooling with seawater is accelerating the disintegration process.

    These nano U-peroxides are doubtlessly extremely air and water soluble…very bad news for life forms.

  • 21stCentury 21stCentury

    ~~~Build A Bigger Breakwater~~~ really soon, like now, please

    http://i281.photobucket.com/albums/kk209/DistantThunderbolt/Japan%20Reconstruction/Fshima7000circle1a_zpsf6b66b14.jpg

    Graphene Electrodialysis Desalination will decontaminate the impounded water, and convert it to freshwater for recycling in the cooling down process. All the radioisotopes can be reclaimed, then vitrified for permanent deep burial.

    Graphene/silica aerogel capacitive deionization can clean the air under the dome roof.

    99.99% seal-off from environment is possible.
    The containment needs to be properly sized to handle the total amount of 2200tons of fuelrods. We seem to be stuck with having to operate this mess as a open pool reactor. Don't fight the water, use it as a moderator pool.. just like a giant spent fuel pool.

  • Heart of the Rose Heart of the Rose

    Fukushima Watch: IAEA Says Controlled Release of Contaminated Water Should be Considered
    March 17 2014

    "A large amount of groundwater keeps flowing under reactors that suffered meltdowns in the accident in March 2011, creating about 400 metric tons a day of highly contaminated water. Tokyo Electric Power Co.9501.TO 0.00%, the plant operator, processes it to remove radioactive cesium, and a new water cleaning system called ALPS, that is capable of removing all radioactive materials except relatively harmless tritium, is expected to start working fully in the next few months."

    http://blogs.wsj.com/japanrealtime/2014/03/17/fukushima-watch-iaea-says-controlled-release-of-contaminated-water-should-be-considered/

    First they have to control the groundwater..
    Note: They aren't talking about the water they are supposedly pumping.

    They are talking about groundwater flowing beneath the reactors.

    They just can't continue the farce of storing contaminated water..
    The solution…dump more contaminates into the sea.

  • Heart of the Rose Heart of the Rose

    All β density constantly increasing outside of the underground wall / Contamination rising from deep underground ?

    http://fukushima-diary.com/2014/03/all-%ce%b2-density-constantly-increasing-outside-of-the-underground-wall-contamination-rising-from-deep-underground/

    No more 'whack-a-mole.
    It's 'catch'em if you can'.

  • atomicistheword

    The corporation does not see plankton, dolphins, tuna, whales, plants, humanity. Just dollars. They have trampled humanity to their knees to worship them. In God they trust. These lawless God's to themselves are set for destruction. An automated process. Whore directors die the same way as the poorest of wealth. Vanity of no benefit, Kings of pride.

  • Max Sievert Max Sievert

    IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano recommends release of treated radioactive water from Fukushima plant into ocean.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gd5bff-UOG0

  • combomelt combomelt

    release….Max Sievert…they can't release!…..where would everyone advertise!?….

    http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o287/combomelt/fukushima-tanks-Bremsstrahlung_zpsf30085a6.png

  • peace1 peace1

    Here is a topic that I have not seem mentioned here. Parasites. And I do not mean the human kind. It has been estimated that 80% of all species are parasites. Most creatures have multiple types within them. They evolve at a great rate and have large unseen effects of environmental complexity and health.

    The thing is that they can concentrate heavy metals and the like hundreds of times more than their hosts.

    To really see what is happening to accumulation they need to be examined and tested. If their population dies off, then we are in for other unforeseen problems.

    I had an idea that since they use any edge they have to control their hosts, what if some of them evolve to use radioactive particles passed through generations to control their host by damaging parts of their brains, etc. That makes for an interesting sci fi speculation.

    • AFTERSHOCK AFTERSHOCK

      your theory's not so far flung, peace1. I recall where an STD was discovered that effected the host and compelled them to want to have sex. This might seem funny or strange to some, but it was for real. I don't recall the specifics as I read the report a few years ago. I also recall another parasite that was transmitted through bird feces and picked-up by unsuspecting ants. They'd carry it back to the nest and others would be contaminated. Eventually, the parasite would disrupt the ant's neurological networks and drive them insane. They'd eventually do what they'd never do and find themselves climbing blades of grass to die in the open. Birds would spot and consume the dead/dying ants, starting the cycle all over. Nature's a both wonderful and beyond question, terrifying…

  • peace1 peace1

    Aftershock, that is a very good example that could be repeated over and over again. They use whatever they can to get an edge. Plus they share DNA so a success can be transferred between species.

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