RTT: Japan alerts U.S. and Canada on possible clogging of shorelines — CNN: Tsunami debris makes its way into Hawaii wildlife… Plastic spilling out of stomach (VIDEO)

Published: March 15th, 2013 at 1:18 pm ET
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RTT, March 15, 2013: Japan Alerts US, Canada On Tsunami Debris [...] Japan has alerted the United States and Canada on possible clogging of their shorelines [...] Releasing the results of its third and more precise computer simulation on the debris on Friday, Japan’s Environment Ministry said tons of debris swept away by the March 2011 tsunami were expected to reach North America by next month. [...]

NHK WORLD, March 15, 2013: Japan’s Environment Ministry says tons of debris swept away by the March 2011 tsunami will reach North America from April. The ministry on Friday released the results of its third and more precise computer simulation on the debris. The report says the main part of the drifting debris, mostly lumber and wooden materials, will start to reach North American shores in April, 4 months later than initially forecast. 105,000 tons is to arrive by June and 221,000 tons by October. [...]

CNN, March 11, 2013: Japanese tsunami debris makes its way into Hawaiian birds [...] Debris apparently from 2011 Japan tsunami is washing ashore in Hawaii [... Lesley Jantz, a NOAA fishery biologist] sliced open the stomach of a lancetfish for CNN. You may never have heard of the lancetfish, a sometimes 4- to 6-foot long fish with enormous teeth. But bigeye and yellow fin tuna eat lancetfish. Tuna ends up on our plates. Jantz pulled out a 12 by 12 piece of indigestible black plastic. [...] Across the island in David Hyrenbach’s lab, the impact of plastic debris is apparent among the animal species he studies: birds. Hyrenbach cut open the bellies of some albatross for CNN. Plastic pieces spilled out of the belly of a 2-month-old albatross. Eighty percent of the stomach was packed with plastic. [...]

Update: TV: Very concerned about radioactive contamination on tsunami debris heading to U.S. and Canada -- Floated through worst of Fukushima fallout -- Will not wash off (VIDEO)

Watch CNN’s broadcast here

Published: March 15th, 2013 at 1:18 pm ET
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7 comments to RTT: Japan alerts U.S. and Canada on possible clogging of shorelines — CNN: Tsunami debris makes its way into Hawaii wildlife… Plastic spilling out of stomach (VIDEO)

  • Naturally, the Canadian government will alert us to any radiation from the debris hitting our West Coast:

    ‘Muzzling’ of Canadian government scientists sent before Information Commissioner Suzanne Legault
    One civil servant calls situation “absolutely embarrassing”; 128-page report detailing the communication barriers Canadian government scientists face now in front of Information Commissioner

    http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2013/03/15/muzzling_of_canadian_government_scientists_sent_before_information_commissioner_suzanne_legault.html

    "Federal Information Commissioner Suzanne Legault is being asked to investigate the “muzzling” of Canadian government scientists in a request backed by a 128-page report detailing “systemic efforts” to obstruct access to researchers.
    “She is uniquely positioned, and she has the resources and the legal mandate, to get to the bottom of this,” says Chris Tollefson. Tollefson is executive director of the University of Victoria Environmental Law Centre, which issued the request with the non-partisan Democracy Watch.
    Newsrooms nationwide are familiar with the unusual restrictions Canadian government scientists face when attempting to communicate their work."


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    • I'll just mention, the above is simply part of the New Canada (let's call it). They appear to be very sensitive about "information" getting out, on anything:

      Federal librarians fear being ‘muzzled’ under new code of conduct

      By Margaret Munro, Postmedia News March 15, 2013 1:14 PM

      Federal librarians and archivists who set foot in classrooms, attend conferences or speak up at public meetings on their own time are engaging in “high risk” activities, according to the new code of conduct at Library and Archives Canada.

      Given the dangers, the code says the department’s staff must clear such “personal” activities with their managers in advance to ensure there are no conflicts or “other risks to LAC.”

      The code, which stresses federal employees’ “duty of loyalty” to the “duly elected government,” also spells out how offenders can be reported.

      “It includes both a muzzle and a snitch line,” says James Turk, executive director of the Canadian Association of University Teachers, which represents more than 68,000 teachers, librarians, researchers and academics across the country.

      He and others say the code is evidence the Harper government is silencing and undermining its professional staff.

      “Once you start picking on librarians and archivists, it’s pretty sad,” says Toni Samek, a professor of library and information studies at the University of Alberta. She specializes in intellectual freedom a


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      • 16Penny 16Penny

        Looking back in history, it was churches that used to stifle scientific advancement. Today, the Earth is still round and we can say it without fear of having our heads chopped of for heresy against the church. I expect that generations from now those who currently are opposing the free sharing of knowledge will learn their lesson the hard way as the churches did.

        So if it is a repeating cycle of 3 TPTB archetypes, Military control is next. If it is a progression, the scientific community might get a crack at influencing the way decisions are made. possibly an environmentally conscious group could emerge in an authoritative role as well. Wouldn't that be a nice change.

        Even if it takes three years for this issue to get resolved in court, at least it has a good chance of being addressed.


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      • NoPrevarication NoPrevarication

        @Pu239:

        “duty of loyalty” to the “duly elected government,”… Why, this reminds me of the 50's when Florida State Government professor at the University of Florida were being required by the state to sign such oaths and be fingerprinted. They didn't.

        Since the advent of tampering with the voting machines I doubt there would be any thinking person who would agree to such "loyalty". I think most people are loyal to each other and not to the "government."


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  • PurpleRain

    I wish there was some way to help those birds..in the short term, in the here and now. (There must be some small step…even if we can't change what happened or is still happening at Fukushima). Does Hawaii have some special group at all organized to help these birds? Are there people there like there were to help the pelicans at the BP spill? If anyone knows please let the rest of us know. Thank you. (And 16Penny — I so often agree with you but don't always let you know).


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    • 16Penny 16Penny

      PurpleRain, I came across this comment while searching for an old link, I hadn't seen it before.

      Thank you for the kind words. I may not always be right but I do put my opinions out there and sometimes just do some thinking out in public (is that a crime? hope not).


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  • weeman

    If it does not exsist in nature naturally we should not be using that product, you are introducing into the Eco system things that never existed, therefore no immunity to its effects, plastic sucks.


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