Tepco: We don’t know if it was a hydrogen explosion at Unit 3 — Tell public it was though because “it’s a speed game” (VIDEO)

Published: October 8th, 2012 at 10:23 am ET
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Title: Behind the scenes of the world’s worst nuclear disaster
Source: Tepco
Translation: treesneedco2
Date: Oct 7, 2012

At 4:45 in

Akio Takahashi (Technical Fellow): We don’t know if it was a hydrogen explosion, but the government, NISA is saying it’s a hydrogen explosion so don’t you think it’s OK to say it was a hydrogen explosion?

Tepco Main Office: NISA has announced on the TV earlier that is was a hydrogen explosion.

Takahashi: I think it’s better to go along with them.

Tepco Main Office: So it’s OK to say… it was a hydrogen explosion?

Tepco President Shimizu: Yes, that’s OK. It’s a speed game.

Watch the translated video here

Published: October 8th, 2012 at 10:23 am ET
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10 comments

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  1. Tepco Official on Unit 3: “We don’t know if it was really a hydrogen explosion” August 8, 2012
  2. Asahi: Video shows Tepco’s hastiness when reporting Unit 3 as a hydrogen explosion — Cause “has yet to be determined” August 8, 2012
  3. Reactor Specialist on Unit 3: “I can’t tell you if it’s a hydrogen explosion or a nuclear explosion” (VIDEO) August 24, 2012
  4. Engineer: 6 experts say nuclear explosion at reactor is possible — NRC: Fukushima Unit 3 explosion had 3 loud bangs, much larger than Unit 1 blast — Tokyo professor’s presentation adds question mark: “Hydrogen explosion of Reactor #3?” (VIDEO) December 28, 2013
  5. Gundersen’s Kansai Presentation: Pellets of nuclear fuel were scattered around Fukushima site — Pieces, not atoms, but pieces — Hydrogen will not create explosion seen at Unit No. 3 (VIDEO) May 13, 2012

10 comments to Tepco: We don’t know if it was a hydrogen explosion at Unit 3 — Tell public it was though because “it’s a speed game” (VIDEO)

  • Sickputer

    "Tepco President Shimizu: Yes, that’s OK. It’s a speed game."

    SP: The entire disaster has always been a speed game to the nucleocrats. Not a reasoned battle against unworldly allen particles brewed up in a lab by a century of Dr. Frankenstein scientists, but a high speed game of deception against the ignorant victims affected.

    No compassion whatsoever for victims. No planning to use all monetary means necessary to stop the radiation and save Japan and the world. It's all about power, greed, misinformation and disinformation, and a failure to learn from mistakes.

    Dogs llearn quickly to stay away from the fangs of snakes, an innate ability passed down through hundreds of thousands of years. Nucleocrats have lost man's self-preservation instincts in favor of abstract objects oc power and money. It is a bad sign for the survival of the human race when the leaders have lost those evolutionary abilities.

    Where are the store piles of borax, sand, and other chemicals Arnie asked them to keep nearby the reactors in case the buildings do collapse and the spent fuel rods become exposed to the atmosphere? What kind of speed game will they have if that happens?

    The fuel rods in the spent fuel ponds are probably fused from heat and they will never be able to extract them…forever. The new nucleocrat "game" plan should reflect that extraction will be impossible in December of 2013. They are one building collapse from total annihilation of the Japanese race.


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  • hbjon hbjon

    If the hydrogen in the coolant were to decompose, there would be different species of hydrogen to accumulate inside containment. Interestingly, 7H decays by throwing out 4 neutrons (so I read). 4 neutrons can cause fission can they not? It goes to figure than that once the fuel left the rods, massive amounts of the heaviest hydrogen was produced inside the containment that eventually reacted once temperatures reached the heat of fussion. Perhaps, it is irrelavent wether or not there was a containment because of how rapid this process was. Once the rods decomposed, you had exposed enriched fuel reacting with atmospherical air, water, and hydrogen. This would be similar to a dirty H bomb would it not?


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  • lam335 lam335

    The "speed game" is the rush to get out in front of the news cycle with the minimizing misinformation before the more accurate–and more alarming–true facts get out.

    If these people had any integrity, the "speed game" would involve telling people the full scope of the danger as quickly as possible so that they would be alerted to evacuate away from it as quickly as possible. But instead they sought to give them a false sense of safety.


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  • voltscommissar

    @hbjon: That's a lot of "ifs"! What decomposition? Sure, hydrogen is released when hot zirconium reacts with water/steam, but it's 2H, maybe with some 3H. If fusion was a risk then Arnie would have told us. 7H is not in the fusion candidates list here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_fusion#Criteria_and_candidates_for_terrestrial_reactions

    Akio Takahashi's candid statements about the Unit 3 explosion simply confirms what we all saw on March 15: A "black steam" explosion, thrusting UPWARDS and containing much debris/rubble. If you read Kenneth D Bergeron's excellent 2002 book "Tritium on Ice" he describes a mode of failure of GE Mark 1 reactors called DIRECT CONTAINMENT HEATING (DCH). DCH involves molten fuel under extreme pressure in the RPV eating its way through the bottom of the RPV, hitting water below with such force that fuel and water/steam are thoroughly mixed, and react together, resulting in massive failure of the containment structures within a split second of the RPV rupture.

    The relevant chapter of Bergeron (2002) is available** as an image-only PDF if you are interested to learn more about direct containment heating. All the detailed modelling was done in the 1970s, and the guy that did the modelling had his career ruined because AEC/NRC did not want to hear how badly these reactors could explode.

    ** http://www.voltscommissar.net/docs/bergeron-reactor-safety-DCH.pdf


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    • hbjon hbjon

      Do you know of any scenario where 6H or 7H can be produced? Sorry, I meant to say H2O decomposition. Zircalloy can indeed melt, regardless of watching a torch ignite a rod during a demonstration. Logically, fuel rods cannot withstand the sort of temperatures that the uncooled fuel can reach. Over capacity pool can evaporate water in under a day. Fact, there were cracks, and pools were losing coolant. Decomposing H2O leads to a buildup of 2H and 3H that is exposed to enriched fuel to produce 4H (a neutron emitter). 3H+4H=7H or 3H+4N. Interesting stuff here, I just pray on bended knee that this all was just a bad dream.


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