U.S. Navy Sailor: Our digital watches stopped working when offshore Fukushima after 3/11 — “We were laughing at first, but then…”

Published: March 18th, 2013 at 1:00 pm ET
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Title: A Lasting Legacy of the Fukushima Rescue Mission, Part 4: Living With the Aftermath
Source: Huffington Post
Author: Roger Witherspoon
Date: March 18, 2013 at 11:09 a ET

[... The USS Ronald] Reagan’s crew had been assured that there was no radiation to worry about over the open ocean and, as the ship’s navigator, [Maurice Enis] had been led to believe that the radiation was a distinct plume that they could avoid. It was now apparent that the radiation cloud was everywhere, and avoiding it would not always be possible.

On the quarter mile long deck there was another alarming note.

“I had a digital watch,” said quartermaster Jaime Plym, “and it suddenly stopped working. Somebody made a crack that radiation would do that. There were five or six of us on deck and everyone looked at their watches — and all the digital watches had stopped. There was one that was real expensive, and it wasn’t working either.

“We were laughing at first. But then that petered out and we just sort of looked at each other because it wasn’t funny anymore.” [...]

Full report here

See also: Navy Sailors After Fukushima: They’ve got leukemia, testicular cancer, growths… They’ve had surgery to remove brain lesions and lost sight in eye (VIDEO)

Published: March 18th, 2013 at 1:00 pm ET
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14 comments

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14 comments to U.S. Navy Sailor: Our digital watches stopped working when offshore Fukushima after 3/11 — “We were laughing at first, but then…”

  • David Krug David Krug

    This is a well written story by the Huffington news. Well worth clicking on to read original.


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  • Time Is Short Time Is Short

    Apparently, digital watches are the digital 'canary in the coal mine' for radiation-induced EMP situations.

    What are the procedures for when a large group of digital watches all stop at once? Bend over and KYAG?

    Thank you, GE.


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  • TheMysticWizard1

    If there is truth to this story, I feel bad for those people. I can only imagine what a large dose of radiation it would take to stop a watch. That size dose on all aboard that carrier… Wow. I hope they have some success with their lawsuit, as for the rest of us… Best of luck.


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  • ForwardAssist ForwardAssist

    It's a nuclear carrier for god's sake, they have two reactors onboard. They cannot feign ignorance. It was a deliberate act with absolutely no consideration for the men and women under their command. It was cold, and calculated. One might conclude that it's psychopathic behavior.

    Doesn't surprise me much, 1 in 100 human beings is a psychopath. When they rise to power in the military they are granted access to a continuous stream of human beings which are duty bound to submit to their whims.

    "I Am Fishead", http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jxq7hiHi1cE


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  • AFTERSHOCK AFTERSHOCK

    all digital wrist watches utilize what's referred to as CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) logic-switching technology. This technology is extremely efficient when it comes to power consumption, but highly prone to what's known as CMOS 'Latch-Up'; otherwise defined as a 'disallowed condition'. Each integrated circuit that utilized this particular (and common) technology, is composed of interconnected transistors that form the circuits logic elements. If an alpha particle impacts with a CMOS junction transistor, the adjacent logic that's can inadvertently change state, leading to the disallowed condition. These disallowed conditions range from innocuous changes in time-counter values to complete freezing-up of the watch. If this 'freezing-up' condition occurred at the same time on all these watches, odds are, they were all being exposed to highly radioactive gases…


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  • TheBigPicture TheBigPicture

    Radiation cloud hit the states, and lots of it. We're just in the beginnings of this, there will be disease. Thanks again, to nuclear.


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  • Jebus

    This paragraph, from the full article, is so oxymoronic.

    "In practice, that meant there was no real way to know what the actual baseline health condition was for each individual. Without that baseline, Veterans Administration physicians could not tell if the development of a tumor, or asthma, or cyst inside the body or on the skin represented a radical departure from the patient’s condition at the time of exposure to radiation or if the condition predated Operation Tomodachi. Without that baseline or an active registry showing similar medical issues among many service men and women, there is little chance for veterans to successfully claim that exposure to radiation lay at the root of their health problems."

    Seems to me that the Navy is saying, that they don't even know the medical condition of the sailors they recruit for duty.

    And then, Uh-oh, so sorry, we just "lost" your medical records.

    But the most irony in the story is Quartermaster Enis respectfully taking down the flag of the nation that he is serving, getting irradiated by it, and then forgotten about, by that same country…


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  • CB CB

    ~ Jebus, "But the most irony in the story is Quartermaster Enis respectfully taking down the flag of the nation that he is serving, getting irradiated by it, and then forgotten about, by that same country…"

    Speechless because it appears to be true.


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  • captndano captndano

    Tthat story is just a little creepy and unnerving, I'd say.


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  • ForwardAssist ForwardAssist

    Here is an interview which features Helen Caldicott introducing retired quartermaster's, Maurice Enis and Jaime Plym.

    "In their own words", so to speak.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6azYbpL0L0


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  • The stories of the four Navy personnel profiled in this series, and others I spoke with were remarkably consistent. A nuclear powered ship, designed to wage nuclear warfare, was totally unprepared to detect radiation in the air and water around it.
    Since there is no internet on the ship, the crew was totally ignorant of what was going on at Fukushima. None of the people interviewed had received a full medical evaluation either in the immediate aftermath of Tomodachi, or prior to their leaving the Navy. There were no internal tests, including X-rays or pulmonary exams. Hence the inadequacy of the medical registry.

    The VA has a 2 – 5 year backlog on new claims. So it will be years before these sailors cases are evaluated and there is no way to keep the registry up to date.


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  • Very cool to have an author posting here. It doesn't make sense that a nuclear powered navy vessel equiped to possibly participate in a nuclear war wouldn't have comprehensive radiation detecting equipment. Can't get my head around that.


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